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The Internet Revolution In The Sciences And Humanities - Isbn:9780190465926

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  • Book Title: The Internet Revolution in the Sciences and Humanities
  • ISBN 13: 9780190465926
  • ISBN 10: 0190465921
  • Author: Joseph E. Harmon
  • Category: Communication in learning and scholarship
  • Category (general): Other
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Format & Number of pages: 272 pages, book
  • Synopsis: Joseph C. Pitt, “Review of Galison's Image and Logic,” Science, Technology, & Human Values 24 (1999): 295–300, 296. 133. Florian Hars, “Review of Galison's Image and Logic,” History and Technology 15 (1999): 384–389, 384. 134.

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Топик по английскому The Achievement of Science, Technical Revolution and Our Day-to-day Life

The Achievement of Science, Technical Revolution and Our Day-to-day Life

As the years go forward our life becomes faster, a lot of new things appear, our mind develops and it cannot stop. It's like a strong river which never ends to run and it is rapidly spreading all over the earth. Many centuries ago people even couldn't imagine that we will be able to exchange information using telephone, fax, Internet as long as they couldn't think that there are a lot of planets except our earth and that people can fly their. If we think how had everything developed, how many new things had appeared and how had the minds of people become so wide we even won't be able to understand it because nowadays we cannot imagine our life without such inventions like lamps, ovens, central heating and others. During the centuries people have been invented the things to make our life easier. A great invention such as transport plays one of the most important roles in our life. We live in flats, can appear in different point of earth within a day, can say hello to people who live in another point of the world. All those things are a product of technical progress and it doesn't stop to grow and develop. Nowadays we live surrounded by machines and other inventions. And with new inventions we become happier because nearly everything is making by machine not by ourselves. And from day to day appear more and more new things. And we don't think about how the first inventions were created. The only thing we know that we never will return to the life which people lived a lot of centuries ago because there is no way back. Everything is handy. We use at home vacuum cleaners to clean the flat, ovens to cook, lifts to walk down in our houses, lamps to make our flats light…. There are a lot of such things like this, and we even don't think about when and where and who invented it. And it's so simple to us. And it's so dear to us that we cannot even live without it. Our century is a century of developing informational connection. Faxes, TV, Internet, and Telephone became the most popular way of getting and sending information. One of the greatest inventions of the century, in my opinion is computer. It's the coup in the technology. When Charles Babbage (1792-1871), a professor of mathematics at Cambridge University invented the first calculating machine in 1812 he could hardly have imagined the situation we find ourselves today. Computer becomes like a brain of human but the only thing it cannot do is to feel. The other things are easy to it. As everything computers also develop. The possibilities of it are so wide. It can do more than 500000 sums in a fraction of a second. Programming became one of the most useful and popular profession. Nowadays computers can pay wages, reserve seats on planes, control sputniks, compose music. Also everybody knows the words Cd Rom, a means of storing information on a disk to be read by a computer, e-mail, which becomes one of the ways to exchange information, the Internet - a network that is a way to get information, to communicate with people, to find everything you need. More and more people become Internet users because we can do so many things their and also cannot say all of them. You can chat there, find job, pay bills, get music, buy something, find abstracts, and know the latest news, exchange information with other people in each point of earth by e-mail and a lot of other functions. As for me it became a usual thing to be connected to Internet. It attracts me by a wide variety of different kinds of information which is necessary to people. Of coarse I use a lot of other things of technology at home. And I think that the main point of such inventions as vacuum cleaners, which we use at home, radio, TV set, mixers, refrigerators, one of the most important thing in every flat all these were invented only after the invention of electricity. So I find the question about technical progress very wide and it's impossible to say about all inventions. And in conclusion I want to say that the technical progress won't stop and the machines will substitute everything except one - the human.

Source:

begin-english.ru

Articles

Design science revolution

Design science revolution

A scientific and socio-economic revolution accomplished through the use of "livingry" design science instead of weaponry, the term design science revolution was coined by R. Buckminster Fuller .
Fuller's main premise was that nature's existing and omnipotent order must be allowed to guide designs made by man, if they are to survive and thrive as a species. Fuller wrote that humanity was approaching its "critical test" as a species, in which it would be determined "whether or not man was a mistake of nature, or its greatest accomplishment."
This subject is covered in both "Critical Path" and "Uptopia or Oblivion": From the introduction by Jaime Snyder, Fuller's grandson: "A comprehensive global crisis is now clearly dawning in humanity's collective awareness, interweaving dramatic climate change and massive environmental destruction as we hover closer to "points of no return"—not to mention the ongoing hazard of nuclear weaponry, and persistent large-scale extreme poverty. It has become harder and harder to avoid the recognition that we are in a full scale planetary emergency. it can be very difficult to move out of denial about our predicament, without the cognition that there is a future scenario where we can turn this emergency into an emergence of sustainability for all life on earth."
And thus Fuller called for a comprehensive anticipatory design science revolution. "Fuller held that modern science was too encumbered by rigid ideas to solve the world's great problems, and that the governing principles of nature -- which even the layman could intuit and harness -- would yield the essential creative solutionos." This is from Fuller's (self-proclaimed) seminal posthumously published work entitled Cosmography: A Posthumous Scenario for the Future of Humanity with Adjuvant Kiyoshi Kuromiya. This contains Fuller's geometry lessons for understanding the functioning of the universe, which he said would lead to the knowledge necessary to manifest results that would allow all humanity to thrive. Fuller said that by simply shifting focus "from weaponry to livingry" all of humanity could thrive. Fuller first called for this revolution in 1965. It was to be a ten-year turn about.
In the SFMOMA show Utopian Impulse, Fuller states (on film) that he believes in humanity's chances of accomplishing this necessary revolution, and he explains that a Utopian type of impulse is a necessary component of human evolution; that "humanity must embrace the best of itself, living lives of conscious evolution."

Source:

ru.cyclopaedia.net

ERIC - Computing in the Social Sciences and Humanities

Computing in the Social Sciences and Humanities. [With CD-ROM].

Burton, Orville Vernon, Ed.

This book-and-CD package provide a lively, hands-on introduction for teachers and scholars in the humanities and social sciences. New technology is changing the nature of research and teaching in the humanities and social sciences. From specialized online forums to Web-based teaching and distance learning, computers are being used to expand educational opportunities, promote cooperation and collaboration, stimulate creative thinking, and find answers to previously insoluble research problems. This book serves as an introduction for teachers and scholars in the humanities and social sciences. It encourages efficient, informal use of computer and Internet resources. Following "Introduction: The Renaissance" (O.V. Burton), this essay collection is divided into four parts: (1) "The Digital Revolution" (Technological Revolutions I Have Known (E. Ayers); and Rewiring the History and Social Studies Classrooms (R. Bass; D. Rosenzweig)); (2) "Computing and New Access to Social Science Data" (Validity of Web-Based Surveys(W. S. Bainbridge); and Computer Environments for Content Analysis (W. Evans)); (3) "Computers, Social Science, Humanities, and the Impact of New Social Terrain" (Electronic Texts in the Historical Profession (W. Plotkin); and Social Activism through Computer Networks (D. Myers)); and (4) "Philosophical and Ethical Concerns of the Culture of Computing" (Creating Cybertrust (H. Taylor; C. Kamarae); and Electronic Networks for International Research Collaboration (C. Ganz-Brown)). The accompanying CD-ROM features multimedia entries such as an interactive project on owls that educates users about forest ecology; RiverWeb, an interactive archive of information on the history, culture, and science of the Mississippi River; and "Global Jukebox," which recreates the context in which the folklorist Alan Lomax made his pioneering field recordings. The CD includes links to many external sites on the World Wide Web. For those with limited Internet access, a collection of relevant sites is integrated into the CD. (BT)

University of Illinois Press, 1325 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820-6903 ($39.95). Tel: 217-244-4689; Fax: 217-244-8082; e-mail: uipress@uillinois.edu; Web site: http://www.press.uillinois.edu/. For full text: http://www.press.uillinois.edu/epub/books/burton/.

Source:

eric.ed.gov

The Achievement of Science, Technical Revolution and Our Day-to-day Life

The Achievement of Science, Technical Revolution and Our Day-to-day Life

As the years go forward our life becomes faster, a lot of new things appear, our mind develops and it cannot stop. It's like a strong river which never ends to run and it is rapidly spreading all over the earth. Many centuries ago people even couldn't imagine that we will be able to exchange information using telephone, fax, Internet as long as they couldn't think that there are a lot of planets except our earth and that people can fly their. If we think how had everything developed, how many new things had appeared and how had the minds of people become so wide we even won't be able to understand it because nowadays we cannot imagine our life without such inventions like lamps, ovens, central heating and others. During the centuries people have been invented the things to make our life easier. A great invention such as transport plays one of the most important roles in our life. We live in flats, can appear in different point of earth within a day, can say hello to people who live in another point of the world. All those things are a product of technical progress and it doesn't stop to grow and develop. Nowadays we live surrounded by machines and other inventions. And with new inventions we become happier because nearly everything is making by machine not by ourselves. And from day to day appear more and more new things. And we don't think about how the first inventions were created. The only thing we know that we never will return to the life which people lived a lot of centuries ago because there is no way back. Everything is handy. We use at home vacuum cleaners to clean the flat, ovens to cook, lifts to walk down in our houses, lamps to make our flats light…. There are a lot of such things like this, and we even don't think about when and where and who invented it. And it's so simple to us. And it's so dear to us that we cannot even live without it. Our century is a century of developing informational connection. Faxes, TV, Internet, and Telephone became the most popular way of getting and sending information. One of the greatest inventions of the century, in my opinion is computer. It's the coup in the technology. When Charles Babbage (1792-1871), a professor of mathematics at Cambridge University invented the first calculating machine in 1812 he could hardly have imagined the situation we find ourselves today. Computer becomes like a brain of human but the only thing it cannot do is to feel. The other things are easy to it. As everything computers also develop. The possibilities of it are so wide. It can do more than 500000 sums in a fraction of a second. Programming became one of the most useful and popular profession. Nowadays computers can pay wages, reserve seats on planes, control sputniks, compose music. Also everybody knows the words Cd Rom, a means of storing information on a disk to be read by a computer, e-mail, which becomes one of the ways to exchange information, the Internet - a network that is a way to get information, to communicate with people, to find everything you need. More and more people become Internet users because we can do so many things their and also cannot say all of them. You can chat there, find job, pay bills, get music, buy something, find referats, and know the latest news exchange information with other people in each point of earth by e-mail and a lot of other functions. As for me it became a usual thing to be connected to Internet. It attracts me by a wide variety of different kinds of information which is necessary to people. Of coarse I use a lot of other things of technology at home. And I think that the main point of such inventions as vacuum cleaners, which we use at home, radio, TV set, mixers, refrigerators, one of the most important thing in every flat all these were invented only after the invention of electricity. So I find the question about technical progress very wide and it's impossible to say about all inventions. And in conclusion I want to say that the technical progress won't stop and the machines will substitute everything except one the human.

Source:

www.native-english.ru

East West Association For Advanced Studies and Higher Education

02.12.16 09.01.17 Language: English German Kazakh Russian Ukrainian Uzbek

IX International Congress on Social Sciences and Humanities

«East West» Association for Advanced Studies and Higher Education GmbH (Vienna, Austria) invites you to participate in the IXInternational Congress on Social Sciences and Humanities. which will be held in Vienna (Austria) on December 2, 2016. The congress will be conducted in distance way without necessity of personal presence.

  • No expenses for a trip and hotel stay
  • Low cost price of publishing services
  • Free certificate of participation

We invite students and postgraduate students, postdoctoral students, employees of educational institutions, without regard to the country of residence, to participation in the conference.

Articles for the congress proceedings are accepted till December 1, 2016 inclusive. Working languages: English, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Kazakh, Uzbek.

Example of output data of an article: Mark, Smith. Humanitarian approaches to the Periodic Law // Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Social Sciences and Humanities. «East West» Association for Advanced Studies and Higher Education GmbH. Vienna. 2016. PP. 112-117.

DOI numbers will be assigned to all publications of the “East West” Association starting from February 2016. The agreement was signed with Crossref, DOI’s official registration agency. The prefix number of our publishing house is 10.20534. you can find us in the members list on the Crossref website http://www.crossref.org/06members/50go-live.html .

Austrian ISBN and output data of the Austrian organizer are given to congress proceedings. Congress proceedings are sent to the authors by regular mail, certificates of participation in congress by email. Part edition of publication is sent to libraries of the largest higher education institutions of Austria.

Term of sending of electronic certificates, electronic version of publication is up to 25 working days after the last date of reception of articles. Term of publication and sending of printed version is up to 15 working days after sending of electronic version.

Sections of the congress

  • Anthropology
  • Art Studies and culture Studies
  • Demography and ethnography
  • Economics
  • History and archeology
  • Journalism
  • Legal studies
  • Pedagogy
  • Philology and Linguistics
  • Philosophy
  • Political science
  • Psychology
  • Regional studies and socio-economic geography
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology

Editorial board of conference proceedings

Members of the editorial board of the academic journal «Austrian Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences» are involved to reviewing process (see http://ew-a.org/journals/61/ ).


Cost of services

Source:

ew-a.org

The Internet Revolution in the Sciences and Humanities - ISBN:9780190465926

Geoffrey Rockwell is Professor of Philosophy and Humanities Computing and Director of the Kule Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Alberta.

Stéfan Sinclair is Associate Professor of Digital Humanities at McGill University and coauthor of Visual Interface Design for Digital Cultural Heritage .

Endorsements

“This is a superbly lucid, erudite, and useful book. Geoffrey Rockwell and Stéfan Sinclair have been actively engaged in creating tools and platforms for text analysis for more than a decade. They bring their considerable practical knowledge together with their critical sophistication as scholars of literary interpretation in a conversational text that is as generous to the reader as it is informative. This will be a must-have, go-to book for anyone teaching or working in text analysis in the digital humanities—and it comes as close as any work to date to making an argument for the value of computational methods.”
Johanna Drucker. Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

“Philosophically informed, historically contextualized, and technologically savvy, Rockwell and Sinclair set a new standard for probing both the conceptual underpinnings and the epistemological potential of digitally enabled interpretations of written expression. By engaging with Hermeneutica ’s integration of past and present, virtual and physical, and theoretical and practical, both advocates and skeptics of digital humanities will benefit in multiple and enduring ways.”
Chad Gaffield. Professor of History and University Research Chair in Digital Scholarship, University of Ottawa; former President and CEO, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

“With great intelligence, creativity, and care, Rockwell and Sinclair, two of the leading practitioners of humanities computing, explore what happens when digital tools, literary theory, and textual exploration are brought together in highly interactive ways. The outcomes are by turns surprising, illuminating, and even playful, but most of all thought-provoking for all those who care about how we read and analyze texts.”
Dan Cohen. founding Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America

“A technological re volution, in its historical context, brings old things around again but makes them new. Obsessed by the never-before-possible, focused on results, we may miss changes in practice far more important than either. Hermeneutica. from the hands of two Canadian pioneers ‘weaving together of hermeneutical things,’ pays attention, gives examples, and provides tools for participating in our renewal of scholarship.”
Willard McCarty. FRAI, Professor, King's College London and Western Sydney University

Source:

mitpress.mit.edu

Computer Revolution - Топики по английскому языку

Computer Revolution

50 years ago people didn’t even heard of computers, and today we cannot imagine life without them.

Computer technology is the fastest-growing industry in the world. The first computer was the size of a minibus and weighed a ton. Today, its job can be done by a chip the size of a pin head. And the revolution is still going on.

Very soon we’ll have computers that we’ll wear on our wrists or even in our glasses and earrings.

The next generation of computers will be able to talk and even think for themselves. They will contain electronic «neural networks». Of course, they’ll be still a lot simpler than human brains, but it will be a great step forward. Such computers will help to diagnose illnesses, find minerals, identify criminals and control space travel.

Some people say that computers are dangerous, but I don’t agree with them.

They save a lot of time. They seldom make mistakes. It’s much faster and easier to surf the Internet than to go to the library. On-line shopping makes it possible to find exactly what you want at the best price, saving both time and money. E-mail is a great invention, too. It’s faster than sending a letter and cheaper than sending a telegram.

All in all, I strongly believe that computers are a useful tool. They have changed our life for the better. So why shouldn’t we make them work to our advantage?

Source:

engtopic.ru

Book Review: Knowledge machines

BOOK AND SOFTWARE REVIEWS Meyer, Eric T. and Schroeder, R. Knowledge machines: digital transformations of the sciences and humanities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2015. xi, 271 p. ISBN 978-0-262-02874-5. £27.95

The authors of this text have packed a great deal into a slim volume, slimmer in fact than the pagination given above might suggest, since the actual text occupies only 223 pages, the rest being composed of notes, reference list and index. The fact that it has notes, references and an index, testifies to the seriousness of purpose with which the authors approach the subject of what might be called digital scholarship. I suppose that the main title Knowledge machines is the result trying to find a marketable title and, certainly, the juxtaposition of knowledge and machines is likely to attract attention. I have my doubts that the use of computers in research in the sciences and the humanities has anything to do with knowledge. except in terms of the authors' definition as the 'the products of research ' (p. 6): the products of research are ideas, models, theories, expressed in language or other symbolic forms and, thereby, constitute information and computers deal almost entirely with the manipulation of symbolic representations of such information. In other words, they are still largely concerned with processing data. However, others will be happy with the authors' definition, even if the reduction of knowledge to some manipulable product might be thought offensive by philosophers, and, as it is pursued throughout the book in a consistent fashion, there is no ambiguity involved.

The authors explain the purpose of the book as being:

about how digital tools and data, used collaboratively and in distributed mode—our definition of e-research. — have changed the way researchers and scholars in the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities do their work. (p. 1)

and the focus is on the Internet, 'as an underlying research technology or infrastructure ' (p. 4) that changes the way research is now being done across a wide variety of disciplines.

The authors bring to the work considerable research experience in the field and the book draws upon this research (over the period 2005-2012) for its data and for the case studies explored in Chapters 4 (on collaborative computation) and 5 (on data sharing). The differences between science and the social sciences are examined in Chapter 6, with examples of projects in these areas and a focus on the different degrees of access to data in the different fields (e.g. limitations of access to corporate data that might be useful in the social sciences). In Chapter 7 attention shifts to the humanities, with the Internet's transformation of desk research from library visits to online access and where textual analysis as a research field is helped enormously by the existence of text-bases such as Google Books.

The book concludes with three more general chapters, on open science (dealing with the tension between openness and proprietary barriers); on the limits of e-research, occasioned by economic, ethical and privacy issues; and, finally, returning to the question of how the Internet is shaping research practice, the authors, present accounts of a number of tools that are now available online, such as the VOSON project (Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks)

Overall, this is a timely and stimulating text and one that anyone interested in the direction of research and the role of the Internet should read.

Professor Tom Wilson
Editor-in-Chief
August, 2015

Source:

www.informationr.net

Tags: galison image logic ebook