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Finding Hope And Meaning In Suffering - Isbn:9780281065189

Category: Religion

  • Book Title: Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering
  • ISBN 13: 9780281065189
  • ISBN 10: 0281065187
  • Author: Trystan Owain Hughes
  • Category: Religion
  • Category (general): Religion
  • Publisher: SPCK
  • Format & Number of pages: 128 pages, book
  • Synopsis: ... Oxford 2001) E. L. Miller and Stanley Grenz, Introduction to Contemporary Theologies (Fortress, Minneapolis 1998) Thomas Moore, Dark Nights of the Soul: A Guide to Finding Your Way Through Life's Ordeals (Piatkus, London 2007) Daniel ...

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ISBN: 084994211X - Hope For The Troubled Heart: Finding God In The Midst Of Pain - OPENISBN Project: Download Book Data

Hope For The Troubled Heart: Finding God In The Midst Of Pain

What hopeless situation troubles your heart? The death of a loved one? The memories of childhood abuse? The diagnosis of terminal illness? The strain of financial failure? A stormy marriage? A body wracked by pain? A lonely sense of emptiness? Into your hopeless situation comes beloved evangelist Billy Graham bearing God's gift of hope, one of the strongest "medicines" known to humanity, an amazing resource that "can cure nearly everything."

Filled with unforgettable stories of real-life people and irrefutable lessons of biblical wisdom, Hope for the Troubled Heart inspires and encourages you with God's healing and strengthening truths. It shows you how to cope when your heart is breaking, how to pray through your pain, how to avoid the dark pit of resentment and bitterness, and how to be a comforter to others who hurt. You'll be reminded that "before we can grasp any meaning from suffering we must rest in God's unfailing love." And you'll find the "joy to be discovered in the midst of suffering."

Here you'll learn how hope helps troubled hearts find peace.

Source:

www.openisbn.com

Articles

Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering

Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering

Everyone suffers at some time or other - it's simply a part of life. But however bad things seem, we are never completely helpless. For the deeply affirming truth is that we can choose how to respond to adverse circumstances. Trystan Owain Hughes suggests that learning how to suffer and how to wait patiently may be the secret of finding joy in our lives. Diagnosed with a degenerative spinal condition, he was surprised to discover that, instead of increasing his unhappiness, it spurred him on to seek out sources of hope and meaning. The book opens by encouraging us to take a step back from our anxieties and worries and rest in the love of God. We then explore five areas where that love may be found in the midst of pain: in nature, memory, art, laughter and other people. By becoming conscious of the echoes of the transcendent in these areas, we will gain new strength. And paradoxically, through facing our suffering, learn to truly live.

Source:

www.idefix.com

Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering

Everyone suffers at some time or other - it's simply a part of life. But however bad things seem, we are never completely helpless. For the deeply affirming truth is that we can choose how to respond to adverse circumstances. Trystan Owain Hughes suggests that learning how to suffer and how to wait patiently may be the secret of finding joy in our lives. Diagnosed with a degenerative spinal condition, he was surprised to discover that, instead of increasing his unhappiness, it spurred him on to seek out sources of hope and meaning. The book opens by encouraging us to take a step back from our anxieties and worries and rest in the love of God. We then explore five areas where that love may be found in the midst of pain: in nature, memory, art, laughter and other people. By becoming conscious of the echoes of the transcendent in these areas, we will gain new strength. And paradoxically, through facing our suffering, learn to truly live.

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CM Magazine: Finding Hope

She gave a mirthless laugh. �The stump? Where you used to build forts? That�s where you�� Her voice trailed off. Looked after him. the unspoken words. Gave him the help that his own mother wouldn�t, or couldn�t: clothes from his room, notes to tell him when Dad would be gone, leftovers disappeared from the fridge. �You never told me.�

�I should have,� I said, but didn�t mean it. It wasn�t her right to know everything about us.

There are few relationships we get in life that can be as close as siblings. Be it a brother or sister, it is a human being (typically) close to your age, raised in the same conditions, dealing with similar circumstances. But eventually lives diverge, and choices are made for better, or worse. Finding Hope is exactly that: the fractured story of teenaged siblings Eric and Hope, the former a meth-addict wandering the streets, the latter a poet who has just been accepted into a prestigious school to hone her talent. Do not let the ages of the protagonists fool you, however�this is hardly a novel for young teenagers.

Told in extremely short, alternating chapters from both Hope and Eric�s perspectives, Finding Hope delves deep into two worlds that seem incredibly disjointed. For the first half of the novel, the novel appears to not know what genre it wants to belong to: teen or drama, and it alternates between the two categories in a very jarring fashion. This was perhaps a purposeful choice on Nelson�s part in an attempt to blatantly spell out Hope�s innocence and Eric�s corruption, but it is a jolting thing to read about high school shenanigans on one page and heavily implied oral sex on the other. Not that it does not put into a sharp contrast the two worlds, but, at times, the novel reads as two very separate stories that would have possibly been stronger as their own individual novels. It is not until midway through the story with the introduction of �Devon� that the pace increases and the stories begin to show cohesion.

However, Nelson should be applauded for her ability to capture �girl world� in an all-female school environment. Though Hope�s story is largely predictable (with a very large missed opportunity for a twist towards the end), Nelson writes her realistically. Hope mischaracterizes her na�vet� as simple innocence, something many teenagers do, believing themselves not to be quite as susceptible to suggestion and peer pressure as they are. Hope�s story is believable, both as an enabler of her beloved brother as well as being a typical teenaged girl. She longs for friends and acceptance, and her actions follow accordingly, even when they are questionable.

Readers are given snippets of Hope�s poetry periodically which is exclusively non-rhyming free-verse. As the holder of an English degree, I did find it questionable how Hope got accepted into what is repeatedly stated to be a prestigious school for the arts on such mediocre writing. Was it possible she submitted pieces the readers didn�t see? Yes, but readers can only judge based on what is shown, and the pieces that are included in the novel can be found in almost any sullen teen�s journal or Twitter feed. Unless Ravenhurst Academy can work miracles, the next Emily Bront� or Gerard Manley Hopkins, Hope is definitely not.

Nelson�s strength is more pronounced in her writing of Eric. Not afraid of realism, Nelson has Eric curse and describe bodily functions vividly. While unpleasant, it is refreshing to see that type of fearlessness in a writer who portrays the truth of a situation rather than a politically-corrected version of it. Too often do we have writers afraid of reality, especially in the �young adult� genre, opting to cut out profanity entirely, or hilariously replace the words with almost-curses that no drug addict in any circumstance would say.

Nelson is not afraid to highlight not just the reality of drug-addiction, but a way in which it can begin: sexual abuse. A concept underused in a genre most commonly directed towards those most likely to have gone or be going through it, Nelson tackles an unglamorous issue and holds it up to the light to show how destructive it truly is. Make no mistake, Eric is a criminal and a burn-out, but Nelson humanizes him to the point readers will no doubt sympathize with his behaviour, much like his sister does, and understand how hard it can be to say �no� to an addict.

Though the title is about as much of a clich� as one can bear, Finding Hope is exactly that. It is not a novel that those unprepared for vivid descriptions of drug-taking and sexual abuse should pick up, but for those who have suffered from an addiction�or even merely loved someone who has suffered from one, Finding Hope provides insight into, and an ability to relate to, society�s misfits and abused. Hope doesn�t come easy, but it will come, if only one is willing to look.

Callie holds a Bachelor�s Degree in English and is currently applying for her Master�s in Film Studies.

To comment on this title or this review, send mail to cm@umanitoba.ca.

Copyright � the Manitoba Library Association. Reproduction for personal use is permitted only if this copyright notice is maintained. Any other reproduction is prohibited without permission.

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www.umanitoba.ca

Project MUSE - Meaning in Suffering

Meaning in Suffering Acknowledgments

No volume comes to fruition without the contributions of many people. Although we cannot name all of the generous people who offered their time, wisdom, and talent, we would like to particularly acknowledge the following people: Nancy Diekelemann and Pamela Ironside for their wise guidance and encouragement. Kathryn H. Kavanagh for her contribution to this volume, astute.

Introduction

When we suffer personally, and when we encounter the suffering of another person, we are confronted with many questions. A taken-for-granted and apparently robust future now jeopardized leaves in its place a hollow of uncertainty and fragility. Painfully unsettling, suffering seems to call forth a natural human proclivity to distance oneself from the specter.

1: Meaning in Suffering: A Patchwork Remembering

Dr. Rain appeared, the bulging pockets on her white jacket straining its center button. She absentmindedly squelched buzzing apparatuses while looking around the room at the four of us and ascertaining our relationships with her patient. She then addressed herself to Joanne: “Well, the chances are about 10% of surviving a year without treatment.” She.

2: The Gift of Suffering

In this paper I aim to focus attention on suffering in a way that seeks to be useful to the healthcare professional. I argue that suffering is a gift to both sufferer and healer and that the way the gift becomes present to them is through their interaction in what well-known phenomenologist Calvin Schrag calls a “fitting response” to the call of the other in the visage of the neighbor.

3: Finding Meaning in Adversity

Finding meaning and joy in one’s circumstances, rather than being overtaken, diminished, and embittered by life’s inevitable adversities, constitutes a universal human challenge. Yet knowledge about this subject is fragmentary and sparse. Although empirically based models have been proposed that address the basic human needs that are disrupted by adversity and.

4: Narrative Phenomenology: Exploring Stories of Grief and Dying

As a way of putting the death of a loved family member or friend into perspective, people tell stories. They discuss who the deceased person was in life, how the person died, and what their own life has been like since the death. During the conduct of a needs assessment study that inquired about the resources people needed to assist them with grieving.

5: Wish Fulfillment for Children with Life-Threatening Illnesses

Children with life-threatening illnesses are subjected to numerous treatments and procedures. They often experience enormous physical and emotional pain and suffering as attempts are made to prolong their life. Desperately dependent on the medical system for their survival, these children and their families often experience hopelessness and helplessness due.

6: Moral Meanings of Caring for the Dying

What is it like for nurses to care for dying individuals who are suffering? I have experienced and reflected upon this experience in countless ways. As an educator I found that this particular journey heightened as I pursued and completed doctoral studies. I began this inquiry at the side of nine palliative care nurses who willingly, openly, and quite profoundly.

Contributors

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Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering - ISBN:9780281065189


Finding Hope and Meaning in Suffering

Everyone suffers at some time or other - it's simply a part of life. But however bad things seem, we are never completely helpless. For the deeply affirming truth is that we can choose how to respond to adverse circumstances. Trystan Owain Hughes suggests that learning how to suffer and how to wait patiently may be the secret of finding joy in our lives. Diagnosed with a degenerative spinal condition, he was surprised to discover that, instead of increasing his unhappiness, it spurred him on to seek out sources of hope and meaning. The book opens by encouraging us to take a step back from our anxieties and worries and rest in the love of God. We then explore five areas where that love may be found in the midst of pain: in nature, memory, art, laughter and other people. By becoming conscious of the echoes of the transcendent in these areas, we will gain new strength. And paradoxically, through facing our suffering, learn to truly live.

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Finding Meaning in Suffering

Finding Meaning in Suffering

My experiences as a psychotherapist and spiritual counselor have made it evident to me that we all seek to discern a deeper meaning in our human existence by connecting with a higher spiritual sense of life, on personal and collective levels.

There are universal questions and concerns that invariably emerge for all of us. Who am I? What is my purpose? What fuels my quest for meaning in life? What makes life meaningful? What meaning does God and faith embody for me?

“The world into which we are born is brutal and cruel, and at the same time one of divine beauty,” wrote the late psychoanalyst Carl Jung in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections.

“Which element we think outweighs the other, whether meaninglessness or meaning, is a matter of temperament. If meaninglessness were absolutely preponderant, the meaningfulness of life would vanish to an increasing degree with each step in our development. But that is—or seems to me—not the case. Probably as in all metaphysical questions, both are true: Life is—or has—meaning and meaninglessness. I cherish the anxious hope that meaning will preponderate and will the battle.”

This is a powerful message to consider as I grapple on a personal level with the meaning of suffering in my life and the lives of those I encounter as a psychotherapist, and simply as a fellow human being.

Man’s Search For Meaning

Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl gives testimony to the existential belief that life is filled with suffering and that the only way to survive is to find meaning in it. In spite of the pain and torture endured in Aushwitz and Dachau, Frankl refused to relinquish his humanity, his love, his hope, his courage. He chose, as Dostoyevsky had written, “to be worthy of suffering.”

Frankl held that it is precisely man’s search for meaning that is a primary motivation of our existence and one that gives us a reason to live in spite of life’s tragedies. As Nietzsche said, “He who has a why to live can bear with almost any how.”

When you consider times of deepest pain, do you not also recall a time in which the existential ‘whys’ and the ‘wherefores’ were most prevalent? It seems that suffering, in stripping away illusions, unlocks those questions concerned with larger meaning. Our heart can open to compassion and creative energy as we deepen self-knowledge and consciousness.

Suffering on the Road to Salvation and Love

Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky believed that man’s road to salvation must be through suffering. In his writings, he presented suffering as always lighted by the spark of God. In his story “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” the narrator falls asleep and has a dream. In this dream, he is taken to Paradise—a mirror image of our earth, but an earth that knew no evil, no suffering.

As he arrives, he realizes that he never ceased loving his old earth, and does not want this parallel. He notices that there is no suffering on this “other earth.”

He says that on the “old earth,” “we can only love with suffering and through suffering. We cannot love otherwise, and we know of no other sort of love. I want suffering in order to love. I long, I thirst, this very instant, to kiss with tears the earth that I have left, and I don’t want, I won’t accept life on any other!”

Dostoyevsky suggests that good can’t exist without evil or suffering. And yet it is this very reality that compels us to question God’s existence. Why would an omniscient, omnipotent being of Love allow this world to be a lonely, painful, frightening place for so many?

Perhaps we are better served to focus our attention on making the world a less lonely, less painful, less frightening place for those whose faith has been shattered by evil, rather than proselytize abstractions regarding God’s agenda.

One could sum it up by saying that irrespective of ‘why’ we suffer, it is clear that love is the remedy for suffering, and that all suffering, eventually, after many detours, leads to love.

The Enigma of “Unfair” Suffering

The Greek myth of Chiron the Centaur tells a story of unfair pain and suffering, and addresses the illusion of a just cosmos. Chiron the centaur, half divine and half beast, was wise and gentle. He was a healer, a musician, astrologer, and scholar. One day, Chiron’s friend, the hero Herakles was battling a tribe of savage Centaurs. Chiron attempted to intervene, and was accidentally struck with Herakles’ deadly arrow. The pain was excruciating, and because he was half divine, he was destined to live with this suffering, for he could not die like other mortals. Zeus however, out of compassion, eventually permitted Chiron release through death.

Here we encounter the enigma of unfair suffering. We may be driven—out of bewilderment and impotence—to convince ourselves that the good are rewarded, and the bad punished, or that there is someone to blame. We search for that secret sin to explain our plight. The truth is, the only viable perspective in the face of unmerited pain, is that of transformation through acceptance of what life is and reconciliation with our own mortal limits.

Chiron’s immortal nature did not protect him from life any more so than our own aggrandized gifts can. We are all compromised by the reality of our duality and the arbitrary nature of life and the Universe. Like Chiron, we are all challenged to either choose the path of acceptance and compassion, or succumb to our lower impulses.

Suffering and Resurrection

Dr. Jean Houston, Jungian psychoanalyst, in her brilliant essay “Pathos & Soul Making” states: “whether it be Krishna, or Christ, Buddha, the Great Goddess, or the individuated Guides of one’s own inner life, God may reach us through our affliction.”

Christ’s primal trust in God was shaken by the betrayal by Judas, Peter, and the disciples. Riveted to the cross he cries out, “My God, My God, why hast thou forsaken me?” He dies, gestates for three days, and is reborn.

Revealed in this story is that trust and betrayal are inextricable. The fullest agony of betrayal is found within our most intimate bonds. It is then we are catapulted into the abyss of the unknown that we give way to complexity and consciousness. It is then that God enters.

Here we encounter the renewal of humanity following death through crucifixion. In more prosaic terms we face our vices and defects so as to resurrect our divine nature. We are regenerated by our descent into our lower nature. While the proverbial fall can potentially take us towards collective consciousness, choosing and remaining on this path is often fraught with conflict and disillusionment.

Unlike Job whose faith remained steadfast during horrible adversity, our trust in life and God wavers during times of extreme adversity. Nevertheless, like Job, it is our task to tap into humility and trust in order to be restored and renewed.

Embracing Suffering to Find Deeper Meaning

On a personal level, I often discover that the need for safety and the distortion that life should be easy and pleasurable interferes with embracing suffering as a transformative journey into maturation. Perhaps it is because embracing suffering so as to discern the deeper meaning means confronting pain, cynicism, and despair, that we often flee this challenge. Nevertheless, only then can we truly awaken to mourning the loss of Eden and accept that there is no safety or rescue.

Suffering is part of the flow of life which can be personally transformative, if we are wiling to give up what no longer serves us so as to move into the unknown. Through our suffering we are humbled and reminded of our mortality and the reality that none of us are exempt from the difficulties of human life.

Suffering is an archetypal human experience. Life is sometimes simply unfair.

Nevertheless the transformative effect of suffering suggests that it is our greatest pain that may contain a deeper purpose. Perhaps that purpose resides in the function of human compassion. The word compassion comes from a Latin root which means to ‘suffer with.’

“Everything in life that we really accept undergoes a change,” wrote Katherine Mansfield. “So suffering must become Love. That is the mystery.”

It is ultimately, through this transcendence that Mansfield refers to, that we affirm “yet I will love and hope.” And so it is.

Related

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pro.psychcentral.com

Why Suffering? REVIEW


WHY SUFFERING? FINDING MEANING AND COMFORT WHEN LIFE DOESN'T MAKE SENSE

By: Ravi Zacharias and Vince Vitale
Publisher: FaithWords (October, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1455549703 ISBN-13: 978-1455549702


T his powerful and deeply worthwhile book is coauthored by the internationally known Christian apologist, speaker and writer Ravi Zacharias and Vince Vitale, Senior Tutor at the Oxford University-based Centre for Christian Apologetics. Drs. Zacharias and Vitale alternate authorship of the chapters throughout the book.

The book begins with a statement of the so-called “trilemma” of apparently conflicting statements:

1. God is all-powerful: He can do anything He pleases.
2. God is all-loving: He cares for His creation.
3. Evil is a reality: Suffering is a real part of our human experience.

Most atheists would suggest that this moral trilemma indicates there is no God, or no loving God – or else He would do something about the evil and suffering. The authors of Why Suffering? show that, logical as the progression of the trilemma might seem, it is essentially flawed. For example, does it really follow that if you love someone you would make their life free from pain? What if pain were the only way the person could learn lessons that would eventually make him or her truly happy – forever? And what if we bring one more assertion into consideration – such as: “God is all-wise,” or “God is eternal … and evil exists only in present time”?

Adding these possibilities changes everything, and Christian belief provides possible answers to the trilemma. In fact, the authors argue, the existence of suffering is more explainable in the Christian worldview than in any other (a chapter by Zacharias specifically compares the answers of Christianity to the answers from Buddhism, Islam, and naturalism), for evil and suffering are admitted and explained in Christianity as part of a larger and supremely meaningful view of existence. This much has been said before in other books on Christian apologetics, but what makes Why Suffering? different is the way in which the question is addressed with a superb balance of studied, logical thought and personal insight. The subtitle of this book speaks of “Meaning” and “Comfort,” and this is a volume that can equally profit not only someone who wishes to intellectually examine the Christian argument for suffering, but also someone who has recently suffered or is presently experiencing the reality of heart-wrenching pain in their own life.

The book is aptly summarized in an editorial review by Oxford author and pastor Simon Ponsonby:

"In Why Suffering?. two of the world's leading Christian Apologists address the world's hardest question. Avoiding the glib or the abstract, they offer us a highly readable, intellectually robust, biblically framed, and truly compelling answer, filled with hope in the God who enters our suffering to end our suffering.”

© 2016 LivingWithFaith.org

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