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The India List And India Office List

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  • Book Title: The India List and India Office List
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  • Synopsis: ... after their appointment. They will be provided with free passages to India ... Royal Indian Engineering College, Cooper's Hill — continued. per annum, which will commence from the date of their landing in India. Posting and Liability to be ...

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India Office List

India Office List

The India List or India Office List was published quarterly in India by the India Office for much of British rule in India. It gave the names and positions of all senior officials and officers of the India Office, the Indian Government, the Indian Army and the British Army in India. An annual version was also published giving more detail on a subset of these officials.

Contents History

The East-India register provided complete lists of the servants (employees) of the East India Company both at home and abroad including civilians, military and marine personnel, also Europeans and mariners with interests in India, but not in the service of the Company, for a particular year. It was superceded by what was initially called The Indian army and civil service list. This later series is collectively referred to as The India list. The LDS (Mormon) Family Search Library has microfilmed editions of this from 1861 through to 1947 and these are listed in Library Catalogue under the title An East-India register and directory.

Availability

Incomplete runs are held in the British Library APAC collection (India Office Records ), the Cambridge University Library (admission restricted) and elsewhere. The LDS (Mormon) Family Search Library has microfilmed editions from 1861 through to 1947 and these are listed in their Library Catalogue under the title An East-India register and directory.

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BBC - Family History - Tracing your Asian roots in Britain

Tracing your Asian roots in Britain Asian arrivals in Britain

To understand your Asian history, it is helpful to know how your ancestors may have arrived in Britain. The following groups below will all have left documents and records which will help in tracing your family tree:

  • Britain’s colonies on the Indian subcontinent allowed many South Asians to travel and work in the UK
  • Indian royal families, (for example, Nawabs and Rajas) and diplomats made visits for pleasure or to submit petitions to the Crown on legal matters
  • Politicians visited to make arguments for Indian independence, while many merchants travelled to London for business
  • Nannies (known as 'ayahs') found themselves employed by the East India Company elite and British officials
  • Scholars came to Britain to teach Persian and Hindustani languages
  • Students came to study and took the Indian Civil Service exam
  • Indian seamen (known as Lascars) worked for the British Merchant Navy

The vast majority of the South Asian population who arrived in Britain from India came after the 1947 partition of India, and there were many later arrivals from Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bangladesh.

Post-war arrivals also included Indian indentured labourers who had migrated to sugar-producing colonies during the colonial period and Indian workers who had gone to work in East Africa.

After the independence of Uganda in 1962, Kenya in 1963 and Tanzania in 1964, there were many upheavals. In 1966, Kenya terminated settlement rights for British passport holders of South Asian descent, creating the first exodus of East African Asian migrants to Britain. This was followed by the expulsion of Asian citizens from Uganda in 1972.

Post-war Asian migrants were skilled workers such as artisans, teachers, medical doctors, and ex-Indian and British Armed Forces personnel. Their spouses and relatives came to join their families who were now living in Britain.

Most of the Asian migrants were Hindu, Muslim, Sikh, Buddhist Zoroastrian (Parsis or Parsees) and Christian (particularly Anglo Indians).

In the 19th century, Asians encountered challenges when they tried to integrate, as their religions were different from the mainstream community.

Many converted to Christianity and some did not change their religion but took anglicized names, as they wanted to fit in and be accepted by the host community. The vast majority did not change their names legally.

Records about Asians in Britain

To help get you started, it is well worth speaking to all your relatives. Oral family history is extremely important, but you must remember that although it carries some truth, it can get distorted from generation to generation.

Finding any information on your Asian ancestors will require persistence in perusing the many archives available. It is also worth remembering that finding any information on working class Asians can be difficult, as their direct involvement with the government administration is often small. However, it is possible to piece together scattered fragments of information.

For records relating to South Asian women, this can be even harder. Females can be traced through their employment or through the records of their husbands.

It is necessary to understand that Asians who lived in this country were liable to the legal system and the rules and regulations of Britain. Therefore, many of their names and details have been recorded in British government and local records. These may include the following:

  • Parish registers before 1837
  • Workhouse records
  • Births, Marriages and Deaths records
  • Censuses
  • Wills
  • Criminal records
  • Local newspapers
  • Passport records which are held at the Oriental and India Office Collection (OIOC) at the British Library
  • Registration to take British citizenship and naturalisation records
  • Ships passenger lists
  • Records of Indian Civil Service candidates
  • Student records in the universities
  • Armed forces personnel records
  • Indian seamen (Lascars) service records, and the Special Certificate of Nationality issued to them
  • Records created by their cultural associations and societies

The following archives will also help you find genealogical information:

  • The National Archives
  • Oriental and India Office Collection at the British Library
  • Local County Record Office of the counties where your ancestors lived
Tracing Indian local history using British sources

Once you have discovered the region and place name of your ancestors’ origin in India, you can build a local history of that place.

During British rule in India, the Office of the Surveyor General and other administrative officials created many maps as well as unpublished histories of different parts of India. Some are available at the British Library, OIOC, and others can be found at The National Archives.

The British Library, OIOC also hold published rare books including Gazetteers for India. Bombay Gazetteer, Madras Gazetteer and Bengal Gazetteer can all give the name and brief history of a place.

  • The history of certain places in India can be found in a digital version of the Imperial Gazetteer of India published under the authority of His Majesty's secretary of state for India in council (New edition, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1908-1931 v. 1, 1909) is available at:
  • http://dsal.uchicago.edu/reference/gazetteer/
  • Another source is The East India Gazetteer by Walter Hamilton (London, 1815). It contains specific descriptions of the empires, kingdoms, principalities, provinces, cities, towns, districts, fortresses, harbours, rivers, lakes etc. of Hindustan and the adjacent countries.
The Indian Civil Service (ICS)
  • Family historians tend to omit or are not aware of the wealth of information that can be found in the printed reference works, especially for those whose ancestors served in the Indian Civil Service.
  • For a detailed list of books and documents available at the British Library, OIOC, as well as a few at The National Archives, please check the Moving Here website at:
  • www.movinghere.org.uk
  • With the Indian Civil Service examination only given in London until 1922, many qualified Indian aspirants for a post thus made the journey to the British Isles. Some of their names can be traced through the records of the following:
  • Civil Service Commission Department that are held at The National Archives
  • The India List, Civil and Military (WM. H. Allen & Co, 1877-1895), which includes names of the Indians who served in the Indian Civil Service
  • The India List and India Office List (the London-based Harrison company,1896-1906, 11 volumes)
  • The India Office List (the London-based Harrison company, 1907-1937)
  • The India Office and Burma Office List (Her Majesty’s Stationery Office (HMSO), 1938-1947)
Indentured labourers to British colonies

The abolition of slavery created a shortage of labourers in the colonies and Britain decided to emigrate a very large amount of Indian indentured labourers to the sugar producing colonies.

The National Archives holds:

  • Official colonial reports on the transportation of labourers
  • Statistical returns
  • Family history information on the labourers in record series CO 384, CO 318, CO 571, CO 323, and CO 571. As well as these major record series, also consult the regional series of each of the colonies
  • For more detailed information on this topic, consult The National Archives research guide on Unfree Labour: Family History Sources for Indian Indentured Labour at: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
The student migration

Indian students pursued a range of studies in Britain, particularly in legal, medical and technical fields.

Asians at first came to Oxford, Cambridge, London and Edinburgh universities, and then in the early 20th century to Glasgow University and the Manchester School of Technology.

Therefore, it may be useful to consult the admission registers of these universities.

  • Oxbridge details are supplied in the:
  • Alumni Cantabrigienses by John & J.A. Venn (Cambridge University Press, 1922-1954, 10 volumes)
  • Alumni Oxonienses by Joseph Foster (James Parker & Co. 1888-1891, eight volumes)

Cambridge University alumni up to 1900 and Oxford University alumni up to 1886 are available at www.ancestry.co.uk on a pay-per-view basis.

As a general example, an application from Amar Singh, a Punjabi student at the Manchester College of Technology, for an allowance of £6 per month for 10 months to enable him to complete his course of study is held at the British Library, ref. IOR/L/PJ/6/899, File 3902, dated 1908.

Military connections

A group of Royal Indian Air Force pilots at Miranshah Airfield North West Frontier in December 1943 © With the British Empire spanning several centuries, military service remains one of the most productive means of tracing ancestors.

Britons often forget that South Asians fought on several fronts and at sea in World Wars One and Two, as well as in many colonial-era skirmishes.

  • The National Archives of Britain holds some of the service records of South Asian soldiers assigned to colonial regiments. Their document references are as follows:
  • WO 97/1702 Asiatic soldiers service records of Bengal Fusiliers, China Gun Lascars, Ceylon Rifles and Gun Lascars (1855-1872)
  • WO 97/2166-2170 Asiatic soldiers service records of Bengal Fusiliers, China Gun Lascars, Ceylon Rifles and Gun Lascars (1873-1882)
  • WO 71 The General Court Martial proceedings of Indian soldiers of Hong Kong, Singapore Royal Artillery
  • WO 25/3521-3524 and 3526 The embarkation and disembarkation returns for Hong Kong regiment
  • WO 25/3469 Casualty returns for Hong Kong regiment (1850-1910)
  • For Asians who were born in this country and served in the British Army regiments before 1913, service records of other ranks are held in the following record series:
  • WO 97
  • WO 10/1997-2213 The muster books and pay lists of the Ceylon Gun Lascars who were attached to the Royal Artillery (for the period of 1846-1855), WO10/2842-2848 and WO 10/2850-2954 (for 1867-1878) and WO 16/780-790 (for 1878-1888)
  • WO 25/638-641 The description and succession books of the soldiers for Ceylon Rifles (1809-1872)
  • WO 25/3504-3506 The embarkation and disembarkation returns for Ceylon Rifles (1858-1875)
  • WO 164/396 Royal Hospital Chelsea: prize records for Ceylon Gun Lascars
  • WO 22/245 and 246 The Royal Hospital Chelsea: pension returns and examination of invalid soldiers of Ceylon Rifles and Ceylon Gun Lascars (1868)
  • WO 23/158 The Royal Hospital Chelsea: admission books, registers for out pensioners of Ceylon Rifles and Gun Lascars (May, 1868 – September, 1876)
  • WO 100/398 An alphabetical list of Indian warriors claiming medals, and correspondence regarding the issuing of medals
  • WO 100/400 Delhi Durbar 1911 medal roll for No.4 and 5 Mountain Batteries, Royal Garrison Artillery, and Army in India
  • WO 100/402 The unclaimed General Service Medals for Indian Service Corps personnel
  • WO 100/405 The Indian Mutiny Medal (75th Stirlingshire regiment)
  • WO 100/404 The Indian General Service Medal with clasp for North West Frontier 1930-1931
  • The digital records of some of the South Asians who served in the Royal Navy; thousands of Indian soldiers entitled to World War One campaign medals and their medal index cards; Victoria Cross registers and World War One Prisoners of War interviews are available online from The National Archives Documents online website. This can be searched using their surname or first name.
  • http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/

The most exalted order of the Star of India was given to many Maharajahs, Nawabs, Rajahs, and Nizams of Hyderabad as well as to civilians. The Kaisar-I-Hind medal and Order of India medal are listed in the India Office list. The Indian Army Quarterly List for 1 January 1912, printed by the Superintendent Government Printing, India, Calcutta, 1912, is available at www.ancestry.co.uk. It lists the names of British and Indian officers as well as their regiments.

The Lascars

The Lascars, or Indian seamen, served on the British merchant ships as far back as the 17th and 18th centuries. Several references to South Asian Lascars can be found in the:

  • The National Archives
  • British Library, OIOC

Due to the harsh conditions and ill treatment on board, many Indian seamen upon landing in seaport towns of Britain remained and did not take the ship back home.

Many of these became destitute and were sent to local workhouses. Relevant records are kept locally with the appropriate local County Record Office.

A Lascar deserter normally stayed at the Indian lodging houses in the East-end of London. Some applied for a pedlar’s licence at the local metropolitan police office.

Those Lascar deserters who did not renew their licences were tried at the Local Quarter Session Court. Relevant records may be found at the appropriate Local County Record Office.

  • The National Archives reference MEPO 2/5064 contains:
  • Correspondence on Lascar deserters of 1937
  • Warrants for the arrest of Indian seamen in 1938
  • A listing of Indians with Pedlars' Certificates issued in Reading (1930-1933)
  • The National Archives reference HO 45/15000 provides:
  • A listing of the Pedlars' Certificates (1932-1933) possessed by the Indian lodgers at 138 High Street, Poplar, and 28 London Street, Reading

The Special Certificate of Nationality issued to coloured seamen are held at The National Archives under record series HO 45. A keyword search can be conducted using the surname of the person on the The National Archive's online catalogue.

  • The National Archives does not hold the Agreement and Crew lists of Asians, but does hold the following records:
  • Record series BT 372 and BT 382 hold Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi Seamen's Services Records ('pouches') (1913-1972)
  • Document reference PIN 15/3238 includes Indian seamen prisoners of war repatriated from the Far East and final settlement of detention allowances paid to them (1945-1959).
  • Document reference PIN 15/3247 includes a list of deceased Indian seamen on foreign vessels (1944-1955). There was also compensation to the dependents of these deceased seamen on ex-Dutch and Norwegian vessels. It gives the name of seamen, rank, next of kin and date of death
  • Document reference PIN 15/4245 includes mercantile marine casualties, including Indian seamen, details of detention in the Far East (1943-1968)
Genealogy and pedigree of Indian royal families and notables

It was a family tradition in India to keep genealogical tables. Special attention was devoted to hereditary connections with the local governing administration.

On occasion these connections might help in claiming rights, privileges or for winning disputes.

In order to determine the heirs for succession to a village headman or local chief or religious leader, it was custom to use genealogical tables. Some records go back two or three centuries.

For example the Rajput royal families kept the lineal succession of kings from very early times.

Some genealogical tables of Hindu rulers appear in the form of inscriptions on stones. These record lineages in the appropriate local village of India.

  • For pedigrees of early Pallava kings consult: Bombay Gazetteer. volume I, part 2, page 329
  • For dynasties of the Kanarese districts of Bombay consult: Bombay Gazetteer. volume I, part 2, pages 277-584

Large collections of Persian papers on Royal orders and grants, citations, treaties, and letters are available, including transcribed documents referring to Bengal affairs between the East India Company’s servants and Indian Mughal rulers and notables.

Please check the Calendar of Persian Correspondence from which certain amounts of family history information can be found.

  • For genealogical tables of the Mughal dynasty consult: Imperial Gazetteer of India. volume 2, pages 368-390
  • For general genealogy of the Pathan tribes consult: Bombay Gazetteer. volume 19, page 207

Useful information on Mughal Royal families in India can be found in the libraries of the Royal Asiatic Society and the University of Edinburgh. Please check A descriptive catalogue of the Arabic and Persian manuscripts by M. A. Hukk, H. Ethé and E. Robertson, in Edinburgh University Library (Edinburgh, 1925)

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Abandonment In Indian Trademark Office: List Of Events - Intellectual Property

India. Abandonment In Indian Trademark Office: List Of Events

The Office of Comptroller General of Patents, Designs and Trademarks, between the 28th and 31st March 2016 took ancillary & intense steps against approximately 1.95 lakh applications which were due for processing at various stages in various departments of the office. The highlight of the motion was 31st March 2016 when around 52,000 orders were issued in a single date for abandonment of the application.

The reason given for the said step by the Registrar of Trademark was to avoid congestion of applications to facilitate in smooth functioning of the office, periodical disposal of pending applications and files is practiced across several countries as mentioned in the Madrid Protocol. Although the reasons provided by the Registrar were in accordance with the spirit of Trademark Law followed internationally but the execution was not in accordance with the law and numerous applications were abandoned without following proper procedure provided under the Trademarks Act, 1999.

The Intellectual Property Attorney Association approached the Registrar of Trademarks in this regards and brought to his notice the gross negligence of law. Taking into consideration the plea of the Intellectual Property Attorney Association, the Registrar of Trademark came up with an order wherein the time was provided to all the applicants whose applications were abandoned erroneously to file their reply till 30th April, 2016. The notice dated 04.04.2016 from the Office of The Comptroller General of Patents, Designs and Trademarks read:

"This office has taken steps to treat the applications as abandoned in which no reply to examination report containing office objections to acceptance of the applications for registration has been received within the period of 30 days as per Trade Marks Act, 1999 and rules made there under. It is pertinent to mention that in all such matters the examination reports were already posted on the official website and were also sent to the applicants or their authorized agents concerned individually "

Not satisfied with the order of the Registrar of Trademarks, the Intellectual Property Attorney Association approached the Hon'ble High Court for an urgent hearing of the matter on 05.04.2016 where the uncanny act of the Trademark registry of abandoning several applications at once without providing ample time and notice was taken into keen discussion.

The Hon'ble High Court of Delhi on 05.04.2016 passed an order on Writ Petitions WP (C) 3043/2016 & 3067/2016 and have stayed the orders of abandonment passed by the Registrar on or after 20/03/2016 till further notice. The order read:

"Keeping in view the startling figures of disposal within a short period of time as well as the serious allegations in the present writ petition, the orders of the abandonment passed by the respondents on or after 20th March, 2016 are stayed. Also, till further orders, the respondents shall not treat any Trade Mark applications as abandoned without proper notice to an effected party as provided under Sections 21, 128 and 132 of the Trade Marks Act, 1999 "

After the order passed by the High Court of Delhi, The Office of Comptroller General of Patents, Designs and Trademarks, on 11.04.2016 has issued a public notice accepting the erroneous method and course of actions which followed and has now requested all the applicants and the authorized agents affected by the same to submit relevant supporting documents by 30.04.2016 to further formulate and carry out necessary steps in the process. The order for abandonment of trademark applications after 20/03/2016 has now been kept in abeyance as per the order of the Hon'ble Delhi High Court.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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Gazetted Holidays in India - 2016 - List of - Holidays for Central Government Employees

** During 2016, Diwali (Deepawali) falls on Sunday, 30th October, 2016. In certain States, the practice is to celebrate the occasion a day in advance, i.e, on "Narakachaturdasi Day". In view of this, there is no objection if holiday on account of Deepavali is observed on "Narka Chaturdasi Day (in place of Deepavali Day) for the Central Government Offices in a State of in that State that day alone is declared as a compulsory holiday for Diwali for the offices of the State Government.

The above are Gazetted Holidays. Most of the State governments consider the holidays declared for Banks under N I Act to be"Public Holidays".Click Here For Bank Holidays. List of Bank Holidays in India 2016

*** Additional Three Gazetted Holidays for offices in States Other than Delhi / New Delhi :

In addition to the above 14 Compulsory holidays mentioned as Gazetted Holidays in the column relating to central government offices in States as above, three holidays shall be decided from the list indicated below by the Central Government Employees Welfare Coordination Committee in the State Capitals, if necessary, in consultation with Coordination Committees at other places in the State. The final list applicable uniformly to all Central Government offices within the concerned State shall be notified after seeking prior approval of this Ministry and no change can be carried out thereafter. It is also clarified that no change is permissible in regard to festivals and dates as indicated.

(THUS OUT OF THE FOLLOWING LIST THREE HOLIDAYS WILL BE DECLARED AS GAZETTED HOLIDAYS IN STATES (OTHER THAN DELHI)

An additional Day for Dussehra

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Reader Ebook The India List And India Office List

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Θ The India List and India Office List for Θ : Great Britain. India Office. • Retire 1 from the Service. WARRANT OF
PRECEDENCE IN INDIA. 172 KAISAR I-HIND MEDAL-FOR Recipients of ist 23
May, 1900. Adamji Pirbhai. H.H. the Maharaia of Bikanir in Rajputana, K.C.S.I.
K.C.I.E. Major.
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Θ The India List and India Office List for Θ : 366 These are the territorial limits of what is generally understood by the term
India ; but the political control exercised by the Indian government extends over a
considerably larger area. Baluchistan, of which a part, designated British.
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Θ The India List and India Office List for Θ : This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.
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Θ The India List and India Office List for Θ : A comprehensive directory compiled from the Civil Lists of the Government of India. Includes lists of military officers, recipients of medals and awards and details of those involved in the government of the Sub-Continent.
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Catalog Record: The India Office and Burma Office list

Catalog Record: The India Office and Burma Office list | Hathi Trust Digital Library

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India Office Records: Arrangement of the Records, and List of Classes

India Office Records: Arrangement of the Records, and List of Classes

The India Office Records are arranged in classes according to the departments or agencies which carried out the functions of the India Office and its predecessor institutions. Each class of records has been assigned a place in an alphabetical sequence. Detailed lists of many of the classes are available in the online catalogue A2A - Access to Archives

List of Classes of Records

A: East India Company: Charters, Deeds, Statutes and Treaties c1550-c1950
B: East India Company: Minutes of the Court of Directors and Court of Proprietors 1599-1858
C: Council of India Minutes and Memoranda 1858-1947
D: East India Company: Minutes and Memoranda of General Committees 1700-1858
E: East India Company: General Correspondence 1602-1859
F: Board of Control Records 1784-1858
G: East India Company Factory Records c1595-1858
H: India Office Home Miscellaneous Series c1600-1900
I: Records relating to other Europeans in India 1475-1824
J&K: East India College, Haileybury, Records, and Records of other institutions 1749-1925 - See A2A
L: India Office Departmental Records
L/AG: India Office: Accountant-General's Records c1601-1974
L/E: India Office: Economic Department Records c1876-1950
L/F: India Office: Financial Department Records c1800-1948
L/I: India Office: Information Department Records 1921-1949
L/L: India Office: Legal Adviser's Records c1550-c1950
L/MAR: India Office: Marine Records c1600-1879
L/MED: India Office: Medical Board Records c1920-1960
L/MIL: India Office: Military Department Records 1708-1959
L/PARL: India Office: Parliamentary Branch Records c1772-1952
L/PO: Secretary of State for India: Private Office Papers 1858-1948
L/PWD: India Office: Public Works Department 1839-1931
L/P&J: India Office: Public and Judicial Department Records 1795-1950
L/P&S: India Office: Political and Secret Department Records 1756-c1950
L/R: India Office: Record Department Papers 1859-1959
L/SUR: India Office: Surveyor's Office Records 1837-1934
L/S&G: India Office: Services and General Department Records c1920-c1970
L/WS: India Office: War Staff Papers 1921-1951
M: Burma Office Records 1932-1948
N: Returns of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 1698-1969
O: Biographical Series 1702-1948
P: Proceedings and Consultations 1702-1945
Q: Commission, Committee and Conference Records c1895-1947
R: Records received in London and incorporated in India Office Records
R/1: India: Crown Representative: Political Department Indian States Records 1880-1947
R/2: India: Crown Representative: Indian States Residencies Records c1789-1947
R/3: India: Viceroy's Private Office Papers and other Government Records 1899-1948
R/4: India: British High Commission Cemetery Records c1870-1967
R/5: Nepal: Kathmandu Residency Records c1792-1872
R/8: Burma: Records of the Governor's Office 1942-1947
R/9: Malaya: Malacca Orphan Chamber and Council of Justice Records c1685-1835
R/10: China: Canton Factory Records 1623-1841
R/12: Afghanistan: Kabul Legation Records 1923-1948
R/15: Gulf States: Records of the Bushire, Bahrain, Kuwait, Muscat and Trucial States Agencies 1763-1951
R/19: Egypt: Records of the Cairo, Alexandria and Suez Agencies 1832-1870
R/20: Aden: Records of the British Administrations in Aden 1837-1967
S: Linguistic Survey of India c1900-c1930
V: India Office Records Official Publications Series c1760-1957
W, X & Y: India Office Records Map Collections c1700-c1960
Z: Original Registers and Indexes to Records Series c1700-1950

A: East India Company: Charters, Deeds, Statutes and Treaties c1550-c1950

Original title deeds, charters, proclamations, royal warrants, commissions, memorials, etc. relating to the East India Company's rights, privileges and properties mainly in Britain; also volumes containing printed or manuscript copies of charters and statues affecting the Company.

B: East India Company: Minutes of the Court of Directors and Court of Proprietors 1599-1858

The Court of Directors met regularly as the Company's executive body, and their minutes constitute the central record of the Company's activities in London. The stockholders' activities are more briefly recorded in the minutes of the Court of Proprietors.

C: Council of India Minutes and Memoranda 1858-1947

The Council acted primarily as a reviewing or advisory body for the Secretary of State for India. Much of the work of the India Office is represented in the Council's minutes and memoranda, but fuller documentation usually lies in the correspondence and papers of India Office departments (see L below). The minutes of the Advisers to the Secretary of State (the body which superseded the Council in 1937) are also included.

D: East India Company: Minutes and Memoranda of General Committees 1700-1858

The Committee of Correspondence, a standing committee appointed by the Court of Directors, considered letters received by the Court and drafted or approved replies. The minutes, reports and papers of that Committee form the bulk of these records, which relate partly to the Committee's supervision of official correspondence with India, partly to the Company's 'home' correspondence (with individuals and institutions in England and Europe), and partly to establishment and personnel matters. Surviving records of most other committees of the Court are included with the records of their successor India Office departments (see L below).

E: East India Company: General Correspondence 1602-1859

The series of Company correspondence brought together here are general in the sense that each comprises letters relating to all kinds of subjects in a chronological sequence. They predate, and in some cases duplicate, the correspondence series kept with the India Office departmental records (see L below). The series are those of 'home' correspondence (related to Committee papers in D above), correspondence with the Board of Control, early correspondence with the Company's overseas factories (known as 'Original Correspondence' in published calendars), and official correspondence with Bengal, India, Madras and Bombay. For Board of Control papers ('Board's Collections') closely connected with this official correspondence, see F below.

F: Board of Control Records 1784-1858

The Board of Control supervised the official correspondence of the Company with its Indian presidencies. The Board's minutes, 'home' correspondence, and draft despatches submitted by the Company for approval are preserved, though not in their entirety. The Board's copies of the correspondence with India were early separated into departmental series (see L below). The bulk of Board of Control records are the series of 'Board's Collections', mainly enclosures to official letters from the India to the Company (see E above).

G: East India Company Factory Records c1595-1858

Artificial groupings of letters, minutes ('consultations'), diaries and other papers for each of the factories, presidencies and agencies established by the Company in India and elsewhere from the seventeenth century onwards. For the India factories the general correspondence series (see E above) and the Proceedings (see P below) supersede factory records from the early eighteenth century (with the spread of Company administration). Papers for some establishments outside India (e.g. Cape of Good Hope, China and Japan, Egypt and Red Sea, Persia and Persian Gulf, St Helena, Straits Settlements, and Sumatra) continue into the nineteenth century.

H: India Office Home Miscellaneous Series c1600-1900

An artificial collection, formed in the India Office in the late nineteenth century, of groups of older documents outside the regular archive series. Company records (compilations, extracts, accounts and memoranda prepared in East India House) and Board of Control records (including the 'East Indies Series' of pre-1784 State Papers furnished to the Board on its establishment) predominate, while collections of private papers and archival compilations by India Office officials are also found. A catalogue has been published: S.C. Hill, Catalogue of the Home Miscellaneous Series of the India Office Records (London, 1927).

I: Records relating to other Europeans in India 1475-1824

Two small artificial collections, made in the India Office in the late nineteenth century, of documents dealing with British relations with the French and Dutch in India, the Indian Ocean and South-East Asia. With these have been placed a collection of transcripts and translations of early documents in Dutch and Portuguese archives, made for the India Office in the 1890s.

J&K: East India College, Haileybury, Records, and Records of other institutions 1749-1925

The Haileybury records relate to the recruitment and training of the Company's writers and civil servants at the East India College, Haileybury (1806-1857), and include earlier recruitment records from 1749 onwards. The records of other institutions are those of: Addiscombe Military Seminary, which trained cadets for the artillery and engineer branches of the Company's armies (1809-1861); Pembroke House and Ealing Lunatic Asylums, which took care of Company and India Office servants who were certified insane while serving in India (1830-1892); and the Royal Indian Engineering College, which trained entrants to the Public Works Departments of the Government of India (1869-1925). A catalogue has been published: A.J. Farrington, The Records of the East India College, Haileybury, & other institutions (London, 1976).

These comprise the archives of the departments set up by the Board of Control and the East India Company, and largely continued by the India Office. With certain exceptions (for example, the Accountant-General's Records) the records of the departments follow the same basic pattern of arrangement:

Committee records
Papers of the Company's committees.

'Home' correspondence
Departmental correspondence with individuals or institutions within Britain and Europe, largely discontinued as separate series after 1879.

Correspondence with India
Departmental series of official letters to and from India, Bengal, Madras and Bombay.

Departmental papers
Files in annual sequences and subject collections in the filing system introduced in the 1880s whereby letters in a department were kept with their replies and associated office papers.
The departmental papers formed the basic documentation for each department's activities, accessible then (as now) through annual registers and indexes of correspondence. The continuing character of many subjects later caused the introduction of subject collections, or accumulations of papers on particular subjects over a period of years, each divided into series of sub-files on different aspects of its subject. To use the departmental papers profitably one should either inspect the lists of file titles in the 'annual files' and 'collections' series for that department, or search the annual indexes and registers of the department for references to particular papers on annual or collection files. For more information about file-title lists, indexes and registers in any department, go to the section below which describes that department's records, and then select again the alphabetical code in the section heading (for example 'L/P&S').

L/AG: India Office: Accountant-General's Records c1601-1974
L/E: India Office: Economic Department Records c1876-1950
L/F: India Office: Financial Department Records c1800-1948
L/I: India Office: Information Department Records 1921-1949
L/L: India Office: Legal Adviser's Records c1550-c1950
L/MAR: India Office: Marine Records c1600-1879
L/MED: India Office: Medical Board Records c1920-1960
L/MIL: India Office: Military Department Records 1708-1959
L/PARL: India Office: Parliamentary Branch Records c1772-1952
L/PO: Secretary of State for India: Private Office Papers 1858-1948
L/PWD: India Office: Public Works Department 1839-1931
L/P&J: India Office: Public and Judicial Department Records 1795-1950
L/P&S: India Office: Political and Secret Department Records 1756-c1950
L/R: India Office: Record Department Papers 1859-1959
L/SUR: India Office: Surveyor's Office Records 1837-1934
L/S&G: India Office: Services and General Department Records c1920-c1970
L/WS: India Office: War Staff Papers 1921-1951

L/AG: India Office: Accountant-General's Records c1601-1974

The Accountant-General's Department dealt with the comprehensive and systematic recording of receipts and disbursements by the Company and the India Office, with the staff of the home establishment and their salaries, with the estates and wills of persons dying in India, and with the leave and furlough pay and pensions of members of the Indian civil and military services. Among financial activities peculiar to the Company period are the ledgers of the early joint-stock voyages and the registers of Company stockholding and stock transfers. The records reflect almost all the functions of the Company and the India Office, and also include the records of the London offices of various Indian railways, irrigation and canal companies.

L/E: India Office: Economic Department Records c1876-1950

The records of a group of related departments responsible for a wide range of economic, technical and social questions. The departments were variously named Revenue, Statistics and Commerce (from 1858 to 1924), and Industries, Overseas, Communications and Economic (from 1921 to 1947). Their records deal particularly with land revenue, agriculture, trade and industry, and increasingly with other aspects of the social infrastructure such as census, posts, telegraphs and civil aviation.

L/F: India Office: Financial Department Records c1800-1948

The Financial Department records are concerned with the financial policy of the Government of India: banking, currency and exchange, debts and loans, mints and coinage, audit principles, pay and pension rules, taxation, and public expenditure. The earlier Company financial records which are also included are more varied in character, and the records as a whole are informative on the home establishment of the Company and the India Office, on the post office, and on railways and public works finance.

L/I: India Office: Information Department Records 1921-1949

Records of the Press Officer (later the Adviser on Publicity Questions) and his department, which dealt with the communication of official policy to press and public.

L/L: India Office: Legal Adviser's Records c1550-c1950

The East India Company routinely retained the services of a solicitor in private practice from 1607, and of a standing counsel from 1684 onwards. These arrangements continued until 1874 when a Legal Adviser to the Secretary of State, combining both functions, was added to the India Office establishment. Among other matters the Legal Adviser and his predecessors handled the legal aspects of Company and India Office property and financial business, and formulation of contracts for staff and equipment for the Government of India, and the transmission of law cases from the Indian courts on appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. A wide range of types of document has survived from these processes.

L/MAR: India Office: Marine Records c1600-1879

These records cover most aspects of the organisation and operations of the Company's maritime service, the Bombay Marine, the Indian Navy and the Bengal Pilot Service. Besides administrative papers (chiefly surviving papers of the Company's Committee of Shipping and Marine Branch) the bulk of the records consists of the official journals and log-books kept by the commanders of ships employed in the Company's service, a series which was maintained until the withdrawal of the Company's shipping monopoly in the early nineteenth century.

L/MED: India Office: Medical Board Records c1920-1960

This collection of administrative files of the India Office Medical Board awaits detailed examination

L/MIL: India Office: Military Department Records 1708-1959

The military records reflect and document the whole spectrum of military affairs both of the East India Company's armies and of the armies of the Government of India. These range from military policy, defence schemes and the organisation of army, navy and air force in India to the careers - appointments, pay, leave, promotions and pensions - of individual officers and soldiers in the Indian Army, the Indian Medical Service and the Royal Indian Navy. Medal rolls, prize and batta rolls, and soldiers' letters are included among the Military Department records, as are the records of soldiers' and cadets' entry into the military service in England before embarkation. The contents of the India Office Military Department Library of official publications are also included here. Associated with the Military Department records are the papers of the India Office War Staff (L/WS) organisation, which maintained its own files on military strategy, organisation, intelligence and supply. A catalogue has been published: A.J. Farrington, Guide to the Records of the India Office Military Department (London, 1982).

L/PARL: India Office: Parliamentary Branch Records c1772-1952

The Parliamentary Branch of the Record Department (see L/R below) was established in 1899 to handle the preparation and recording of Parliamentary Papers concerned with India. The records also include a series of India Office answers to Parliamentary Questions.

L/PO: Secretary of State for India: Private Office Papers 1858-1948

Papers relating to issues on which Secretaries of State acted personally were kept by the private secretaries and not registered in India Office departments. Increasingly after about 1904 Secretaries of State, on retirement or resignation, left such papers in the Private Office. The papers thus left concern major political and constitutional issues, including relations with princely state and foreign governments.

L/PWD: India Office: Public Works Department Records 1839-1931

These records contain documentation on matters involving bridges, roads, canals, and irrigation, civil engineering, railways, telegraphs, wireless telegraphy and civil aviation, until that responsibility was devolved to Indian provincial governments. Thereafter the Public Works Department's remaining functions were transferred to the Economic and Overseas Department (see L/E above) and the Financial Department (see L/F above). The archives of the Indo-European Telegraph Department and of the Royal Indian Engineering College are kept with these records.

L/P&J: India Office: Public and Judicial Department Records 1795-1950

The Public and Judicial Department records, similar in scope to those of the Home Department of the Government of India, are essential to the study of the domestic affairs of British India. The central core of material concerns constitutional, political and administrative structures and reforms, the administration of justice (especially courts and jails), and law and order (particularly the control of political opposition groups regarded as seditious). In 1941 the department merged with the Political (Internal) Department, concerned with Indian princely states, to form the new Political Department for the internal affairs of India.

L/P&S: India Office: Political and Secret Department Records 1756-c1950

These records, similar in scope to those of the Foreign Department of the Government of India, form two main groupings: 'Internal' and 'External'. The 'Internal' series concern relations with the Indian princely states. the 'External' series concern India's foreign policy and frontier affairs, including relations with the Middle East, Iran, Afghanistan, Russian Central Asia, Nepal, Bhutan, Tibet, China, South-East Asia, and other Western powers. This distinction had early been present in the gradual assignment of princely states matters to the Political branch and of foreign affairs by the Secret branch in the old department, and formed the basis of the administrative division in 1931 into the Political (Internal) and Political (External) departments. The contents of the Political and Secret Department Library of official publications, and of the departmental reference collection of official Memoranda, are also included here. For the Political and Secret Department reference map collection see W below.

L/R: India Office: Record Department Papers 1859-1959

These materials include the files of the Record Department, its predecessor Registry and Record Department, and (up to 1959) the India Office Library. The Record Department was responsible for ecclesiastical returns (see N below), for the receipt of Indian official publications (see V below) and maps (see X and Y below), for Parliamentary Papers, and for enquiries involving use of the records. As such it was the direct antecedent of the administration of the India Office Records. Between 1859 and 1880 the Record Department kept a series of telegrams to and from India in all departments.

L/SUR: India Office: Surveyor's Office Records 1837-1934

Records relating to the construction and maintenance of East India Company and India Office buildings in England, chiefly in London but also including Addiscombe Military Seminary.

L/S&G: India Office: Services and General Department Records c1920-c1970

The Services and General Department was created in 1924 primarily to centralise the handling of personnel and establishment questions previously divided among other departments. India Office Establishment Branch files and personal files of members of the Indian civil services serving in 1947 are also included. The department was responsible for the management of the Indian civil services and of the India Office establishment, and (among residual responsibilities) for general policy on archaeology, education, zoology and copyright.

These papers are described and listed with Military Department Records (see L/MIL above).

M: Burma Office Records 1932-1948

The Burma Office records cover all the administration operations of the Burma Office, as it was constituted in 1937, and include the files of the Burma Reforms Branch of the Public and Judicial Department preparing for separation from 1932 onwards. The Burma Office maintained an annual file series from 1937 to 1943 (with separate series of 'Private' and 'Intelligence' files), and developed subject departments with annual files sequences in 1946. A guide has been published: A. Griffin, A Brief Guide to Sources for the Study of Burma in the India Office Records (London, 1979).

N: Returns of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 1698-1969

Returns of baptisms, marriages and burials, relating mainly to European and Eurasian Christians in India, Burma and other areas administrated by the East India Company and the Government of India. The returns were transmitted by chaplains and ministers to the Government of India, and thence to the India Office, primarily for record purposes. Apart from the series for the three Indian presidencies (Bengal 1713-1948; Madras 1698-1948, and Bombay, 1709-1948), there are returns for St Helena (1767-1835), Fort Marlborough (1759-1825), Penang (1799-1829), Macao and Whampoa (1820-1833), Burma (1937-1957), India and Pakistan (1949-1968), Kuwait (1937-1961), and Aden (1840-1969). Copies of the contemporary indexes and microfilm of many of the registers may be consulted directly in the Reading Room. See also: India Office Records Family History .

O: Biographical Series 1702-1948

Various series and compilations of a biographical nature, which do not fall into the main archive classes, are brought together here: bonds, agreements and warrants for civil servants and other residents in India; records relating to Europeans in India; and "personal records" compilations made at East India House. A guide to biographical records throughout the India Office Records has been published: I.A. Baxter, India Office Library and Records: A Brief Guide to Biographical Sources (London, 1979; second edition, 1990).

P: Proceedings and Consultations 1702-1945

Bound copies of some of the main records of the central and provincial governments in India were routinely sent ot London for the information of the East India Company and the India Office. Before 1860 these records were usually known as 'Consultations' and mostly comprise manuscript copies of the correspondence, minutes and resolutions of the governments concerned. From 1860 onwards the Proceedings are mainly printed copies of the official business of Government departments, and include papers on the more important administrative measures only. After 1921 Proceedings gradually ceased to be routinely transmitted to London. For each government the list of proceedings is arranged by department or branch, and then chronologically. The list is in twelve parts: 1 Introduction; 2 Bengal; 3 India; 4 Madras; 5 Bombay; 6 United Provinces; 7 Punjab; 8 Assam; 9 Bihar and Orissa; 10 Central Provinces; 11 Burma; 12 Other Administrations.

Q: Commission, Committee and Conference Records c1895-1947

Papers of special investigating or deliberative bodies mostly working in India or Britain, deposited in the India Office by the authorities concerned. Chiefly unpublished proceedings and minutes of evidence, the records also include papers of official participants in international conferences. Among bodies represented are the Indian Statutory Commission, the Indian Round Table Conferences and the Indian Franchise Committee.

R: Records received in London and incorporated in India Office Records

Records of related or subsidiary bodies, received in London by the India Office and its successors through official channels, and incorporated in the India Office Records.

R/1: India: Crown Representative: Political Department Indian States Records 1880-1947
R/2: India: Crown Representative: Indian States Residencies Records c1789-1947
R/3: India: Viceroy's Private Office Papers and other Government Records 1899-1948
R/4: India: British High Commission Cemetery Records c1870-1967
R/5: Nepal: Kathmandu Residency Records c1792-1872
R/8: Burma: Records of the Governor's Office 1942-1947
R/9: Malaya: Malacca Orphan Chamber and Council of Justice Records c1685-1835
R/10: China: Canton Factory Records 1623-1841
R/12: Afghanistan: Kabul Legation Records 1923-1948
R/15: Gulf States: Records of the Bushire, Bahrain, Kuwait, Muscat and Trucial States Agencies 1763-1951
R/19: Egypt: Records of the Cairo, Alexandria and Suez Agencies 1832-1870
R/20: Aden: Records of the British Administrations in Aden 1837-1967

R/1: India: Crown Representative: Political Department Indian States Records 1880-1947

This collection was transferred to the British High Commission in New Delhi, and then to the Commonwealth Relations Office, in 1947 and 1948. It consists of secret files on Indian State matters, selected from Political Department records in India concerning paramountcy (the special authority exercised by the Viceroy as 'His Majesty's Representative for the Exercise of the Functions of the Crown in its Relations with Indian States'), the affairs of particular states and rulers, and honours and political service questions. The files contain correspondence with rulers, with central government officials ('Residents' and 'Political Agents') in Indian States, and with the India Office.

R/2: India: Crown Representative: Indian States Residencies Records c1789-1947

These records, from the offices of Residents and Political Agents in Indian States, were transferred to London in the same process as the Political Department records (see R/1 above). They were selected on the same criteria, and include correspondence with state authorities, with the Political Department, and with provincial governments. The records are arranged by Residencies and Political Agencies: Baroda and Gujarat States; Central India; Eastern States; Gwalior (with Rampur and Benares); Hyderabad; Kashmir; Kolhapur and Deccan States; Madras States; Mysore; Punjab Hill States; Rajputana; and Western India States. Few series contain files earlier than 1880, although Mysore Commission records and Bombay Political Department records (for Kolhapur and Western India) date from c1800.

R/3: India: Viceroy's Private Office Papers and other Government Records 1899-1948

Various small collections received from India in the 1940s: Viceroy's Private Office files (1899-1948) on honours matters and political questions (including Gandhi and civil disobedience); and provincial government records (1932-1947), including Bengal Secretariat files on political affairs and some Punjab police files. A guide has been published for part of the collection: A.K. Jasbir Singh, Gandhi and Civil Disobedience: Documents in the India Office Records 1922-1946 (London, 1980).

R/4: India: British High Commission Cemetery Records c1870-1967

A collection received from the British High Commission in New Delhi in 1972 and 1973, concerning the maintenance of cemeteries in India.

R/5: Nepal: Kathmandu Residency Records c1792-1872

Four series of government and miscellaneous letter books of the Residency in Kathmandu, received in London in the 1950s.

R/8: Burma: Records of the Governor's Office 1942-1947

A collections of files, received through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1969, relating to the Burma Government's wartime exile at Simla. The files were created in the offices of the Governor's Secretary and the Governor's Counsellor.

R/9: Malaya: Malacca Orphan Chamber and Council of Justice Records c1685-1835

These records, donated to the India Office by the Government of Malaya in 1927, emanate from the administration of the Orphan Chamber (Weeskamer ) and the Council of Justice (Raad van Justitie ) in Malacca in the period 1785-1825, and are for the most part in Dutch. A list has been published: I.A. Baxter, 'Dutch Records from Malacca in the India Office Records', Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 56 (1983), pp. 105-133.

R/10: China: Canton Factory Records 1623-1841

Records of the Company's supercargoes (superintendents of trade) at Canton and Macao, received through the Foreign Office in London in 1931.

R/12: Afghanistan: Kabul Legation Records 1923-1948

Subject files from the records of the Kabul Legation, received through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office between 1965 and 1975. A guide has been published: L.A. Hall, A Brief Guide to Sources for the Study of Afghanistan in the India Office Records (London, 1981).

R/15: Gulf States: Records of the Bushire, Bahrain, Kuwait, Muscat and Trucial States Agencies 1763-1951

Letter books, files and compilations from the British Political Residencies in the Persian Gulf, received through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office between 1957 and 1973. The records are from the residency at Bushire (1763-1948) and the agencies at Bahrain (1899-1951), Trucial Coast (1930-1951), Kuwait (1904-1949) and Muscat (1867-1951). A large sub-series consists of records of the Political Agent's Court at Bahrain. A catalogue has been published: P.J. Tuson, The Records of the British Residency and Agencies in the Persian Gulf (London, 1979).

R/19: Egypt: Records of the Cairo, Alexandria and Suez Agencies 1832-1870

Correspondence and accounts of the East India Company's shipping agents at Cairo, Alexandria and Suez. These records were deposited in the India Office in the late nineteenth century, and were at first included in Egypt and Red Sea factory records (see G above).

R/20: Aden: Records of the British Administrations in Aden 1837-1967

Records of the successive British administrations in Aden: the Political Residency under the Bombay Government (1839-1932); the Chief Commissionership under the Government of India (1932-1937); the British Crown Colony (1937-1963); and the British High Commission (1963-1967). The records, received from the Foreign Office in 1966 and 1967, consist of general administrative correspondence and files, and include records transferred from Bombay to Aden and records accumulating in the Mukalla Residency. The collection also includes the High Commission library, and the Aden Records map collection (see W below).

S: Linguistic Survey of India Records c1900-c1930

Includes correspondence files and research data of Sir George Grierson, Superintendent of the Linguistic Survey from 1898 to1902.

V: India Office Records Official Publications Series c1760-1957

The India Office archive collection of British Indian central and provincial government publications, maintained by the Record Department (see L/R above) until 1947. The collection also includes India Office reference sets of British statutes, parliamentary journals, debates and papers, and other British publications relating to Indian affairs.

South Asia through Official Eyes - Mapping the national collection of South Asian Official Publications, a joint project hosted by the Bodleian Library.

W, X & Y: India Office Records Map Collections c1700-c1960

The 'W' class designates maps from other classes in the records and chiefly consists of maps associated with volumes and files in India Office Departmental Papers series. With these are kept the Political and Secret Department separate map collection (W/LPS), and the Aden Records map collection (W/R20). The 'X' class is the India Office reference collection of maps, maintained by the Geographical Department and, after 1884, by the Record Department (see L/R above). The collection includes manuscript and printed maps, plans, charts, drawings, atlases and geographical memoirs, relating to India and adjacent countries, and to East India Company shipping routes. The 'Y' class is an extension of the 'X' class and accommodates the India Office Record Department archive sets of topographical and small-scale map series, produced chiefly by the Survey of India in line with the recommendations of the 1904-05 Indian Survey Committee.

Z: Original Registers and Indexes to Records Series c1700-1950

Separately bound indexes and registers bear the prefix letter 'Z' followed by the letter of the class to which they relate. The contemporary indexes for each class are also included in the Summary List of records for that class.

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