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The Trouble With Therapy: Sociology And Psychotherapy - Isbn:9780335236886

Category: Psychology

  • Book Title: The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy
  • ISBN 13: 9780335236886
  • ISBN 10: 033523688X
  • Author: Peter Morrall
  • Category: Psychology
  • Category (general): Psychology
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
  • Format & Number of pages: 267 pages, book
  • Synopsis: ... the bringing together of the laws of physics, chemistry, mathematics, and cosmology under 'science') form an 'epistemology'. Epistemology, therefore, means a collection of theoretical frameworks that define a particular type of knowledge.

Another description

Interactional Practices of Psychotherapy

Interactional Practices of Psychotherapy References

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Beck, A. T. (1976). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. New York: International Universities Press.

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Falk, H. (2013). Discussing Anorexia. A conversation analytical study on treatment discussions between anorectic patients and professionals. Publications of the Department of Social Research 2013:11, Sociology, University of Helsinki.

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Koivisto, A. & Voutilainen, L. (2014). Responding to what is left implicit: Therapist’s for-mulations after a turn-final että (that/so). Paper presented at International Conference on Conversation Analysis and Psychotherapy, Gent, Belgium.

Leiman, M. & Stiles, W. B. (2001). Dialogical sequence analysis and the zone of proximal development as conceptual enhancements to the assimilation model: The case of Jan revisited. Psychotherapy Research, 11 (3), 311–330. CrossRef

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MacMartin, C. (2008). Resisting optimistic questions in narrative and solution-focused therapies. In A. Peräkylä, C. Antaki, S. Vehviläinen, & I. Leudar (Eds.), Conversation analysis and psychotherapy (pp. 80–99). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossRef

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Peräkylä, A. Antaki, C. Vehviläinen, S. & Leudar, I. (2008a). Analysing Psychotherapy in Practice. In A. Peräkylä, C. Antaki, S. Vehiläinen, & I. Leudar (Eds.), Conversation analysis and psychotherapy (pp. 5–25). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossRef

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Vehviläinen, S. Peräkylä, A. Antaki, C. & Leudar, I. (2008). A review of the conversational practices of psychotherapy. In Peräkylä, A. Antaki, C. Vehviläinen, S. & Leudar, I. (Eds.), Conversation analysis and psychotherapy (pp. 188–197) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossRef

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Weiste, E. Voutilainen, L. & Peräkylä, A. (2015). Epistemic asymmetries in psychotherapy interaction: Therapists’ practices to display access into clients’ inner experiences. Sociology of Health andIllness. doi: 10.1111/1467–9566.12384

Recommended reading

• Peräkylä, A. Antaki, C, Veheviläinen, S. & Leudar, I. (Eds.) (2008). Conversation analysis and psychotherapy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

• Fitzgerald, P. (2013). Therapy talk: Conversation analysis in practice. Palgrave Macmillan. CrossRef

• Muntigl, P. & Horvath, A. O. (2013). The therapeutic relationship in action: How therapists and clients co-manage relational disaffiliation. Psychotherapy Research, 24 (3), 327–345. CrossRef

• Vehviläinen, S. (2003). Preparing and delivering interpretations in psychoanalytic interaction. Text, 23 (4), 573–606.

Source:

link.springer.com

Articles

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy

An increasing number of people are engaging in therapy. As a consequence there is a growing debate about the benefits of therapy and its place in global society.

In this exciting and engaging new text Peter Morrall argues that therapy should be treated with healthy scepticism and provides a compelling, contemporary, and controversial argument as to how we should construct a sceptical view.

In an engaging style akin to authors such as Oliver Burkeman, Stan Ferudi and Alain de Botton, the author offers a sociology of psychotherapy as well as placing sociology in therapy. The author explores the links between therapy and science, therapy and power, therapy and reality, madness and normality, and personal misery and the values of global society.

The author asks questions about therapy and the "therapy culture" of the modern day. Is therapy dysfunctional, arrogant, selfish, abusive, infectious, insane and deceitful?

The author illustrates different aspects of therapy using a troubled character called Heather, who undergoes therapy and features in vignettes throughout the book.

This innovative, engaging, and compelling analysis of therapy is a wake-up call about therapy. It is essential reading for anyone interested in psychotherapy, counselling, sociology or the human condition.

Source:

en.bookfi.net

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy - Peter Morrall

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy Description:

An increasing number of people are engaging in therapy. As a consequence there is a growing debate about the benefits of therapy and its place in global society.

In this exciting and engaging new text Peter Morrall argues that therapy should be treated with healthy scepticism and provides a compelling, contemporary, and controversial argument as to how we should construct a sceptical view.

In an engaging style akin to authors such as Oliver Burkeman, Stan Ferudi and Alain de Botton, the author offers a sociology of psychotherapy as well as placing sociology in therapy. The author explores the links between therapy and science, therapy and power, therapy and reality, madness and normality, and personal misery and the values of global society.

The author asks questions about therapy and the "therapy culture" of the modern day. Is therapy dysfunctional, arrogant, selfish, abusive, infectious, insane and deceitful?

The author illustrates different aspects of therapy using a troubled character called Heather, who undergoes therapy and features in vignettes throughout the book.

This innovative, engaging, and compelling analysis of therapy is a wake-up call about therapy. It is essential reading for anyone interested in psychotherapy, counselling, sociology or the human condition.

Source:

www.ebooks-share.net

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy Repost


Peter Morrall - The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy
Published: 2008-09-01 | ISBN: 033521875X. 0335218768 | PDF | 272 pages | 20 MB

An increasing number of people are engaging in therapy. As a consequence there is a growing debate about the benefits of therapy and its place in global society.
In this exciting and engaging new text Peter Morrall argues that therapy should be treated with healthy scepticism and provides a compelling, contemporary, and controversial argument as to how we should construct a sceptical view.
In an engaging style akin to authors such as Oliver Burkeman, Stan Ferudi and Alain de Botton, the author offers a sociology of psychotherapy as well as placing sociology in therapy. The author explores the links between therapy and science, therapy and power, therapy and reality, madness and normality, and personal misery and the values of global society.
The author asks questions about therapy and the "therapy culture" of the modern day. Is therapy dysfunctional, arrogant, selfish, abusive, infectious, insane and deceitful?
The author illustrates different aspects of therapy using a troubled character called Heather, who undergoes therapy and features in vignettes throughout the book.
This innovative, engaging, and compelling analysis of therapy is a wake-up call about therapy. It is essential reading for anyone interested in psychotherapy, counselling, sociology or the human condition.

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The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy

The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy

An increasing number of people are engaging in therapy. As a consequence there is a growing debate about the benefits of therapy and its place in global society.

In this exciting and engaging new text Peter Morrall argues that therapy should be treated with healthy scepticism and provides a compelling, contemporary, and controversial argument as to how we should construct a sceptical view.

In an engaging style akin to authors such as Oliver Burkeman, Stan Ferudi and Alain de Botton, the author offers a sociology of psychotherapy as well as placing sociology in therapy. The author explores the links between therapy and science, therapy and power, therapy and reality, madness and normality, and personal misery and the values of global society.

The author asks questions about therapy and the "therapy culture" of the modern day. Is therapy dysfunctional, arrogant, selfish, abusive, infectious, insane and deceitful?

The author illustrates different aspects of therapy using a troubled character called Heather, who undergoes therapy and features in vignettes throughout the book.

This innovative, engaging, and compelling analysis of therapy is a wake-up call about therapy. It is essential reading for anyone interested in psychotherapy, counselling, sociology or the human condition.

Source:

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The Gift of Therapy: An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients (P

图书介绍

Irvin Yalom, "The Gift of Therapy: An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients (P.S.)"
Harper Perennial | 2009 | ISBN: 0061719617 | 320 pages | PDF | 1,3 MB


From Publishers Weekly
If the future of psychotherapy lies in psychopharmaceuticals and the short-term therapies stipulated by HMOs, argues Yalom, then the profession is in trouble. Yalom, the recipient of both major awards given by the American Psychiatric Association, professor emeritus of psychiatry at Stanford and the author of both fiction and nonfiction volumes about psychotherapy, writes this book in response to that crisis. Based on knowledge gained from his 35 years of practice, the resulting book of tips (a "gift" for the next generation of therapists) is an enlightening refutation of "brief, superficial, and insubstantial" forms of therapy. Yalom, who references Rilke and Nietzsche as well as Freud's protege Karen Horney and the founder of client-centered therapy, Carl Rogers, describes therapy as "a genuine encounter with another person." He suggests that therapists avoid making DSM IV diagnoses (except for insurance purposes), since these "threaten the human, the spontaneous, the creative and uncertain nature of the therapeutic venture." He also encourages psychotherapists to use dream analysis, group therapy and, when appropriate, wholly inventive forms of treatment. Traditionalists will probably squirm at some of his suggestions (particularly "Revealing the Therapist's Personal Life" and "Don't Be Afraid of Touching Your Patient"). Other tips, though, such as "Never Be Sexual with Patients" are no-brainers. Although the book dies somewhat in the second half, and not much here is new, the wise ideas are perfectly accessible. (Jan.)Forecast: Yalom has explored many of these ideas before. His followers will certainly be charmed, and newcomers patients as much as therapists may be won over by his openness and tender tone.

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The Sociology of Counselling and Psychotherapy - Download Free Movies Games MP3 Albums and Softwares!

An increasing number of people are engaging in therapy. As a consequence there is a growing debate about the benefits of therapy and its place in global society.
In this exciting and engaging new text Peter Morrall argues that therapy should be treated with healthy scepticism and provides a compelling, contemporary, and controversial argument as to how we should construct a sceptical view.
In an engaging style akin to authors such as Oliver Burkeman, Stan Ferudi and Alain de Botton, the author offers a sociology of psychotherapy as well as placing sociology in therapy. The author explores the links between therapy and science, therapy and power, therapy and reality, madness and normality, and personal misery and the values of global society.
The author asks questions about therapy and the "therapy culture" of the modern day. Is therapy dysfunctional, arrogant, selfish, abusive, infectious, insane and deceitful?
The author illustrates different aspects of therapy using a troubled character called Heather, who undergoes therapy and features in vignettes throughout the book.
This innovative, engaging, and compelling analysis of therapy is a wake-up call about therapy. It is essential reading for anyone interested in psychotherapy, counselling, sociology or the human condition.

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The Trouble with Therapy: Sociology and Psychotherapy - ISBN:9780335236886

Karen G. Costa, LCSW

I blend psychodynamic theory with pragmatic behavioral approaches to treatment, while my understanding of the human experience is informed by my studies in metaphysics and literature.

Working with adults, couples, families, and children, I strive to create an environment where patients can discover how they came to this place in their lives, how they can embrace their true selves, and how they can cope with the world around them, whether they’re struggling with depression, anxiety, OCD, addiction, trauma, sexual issues, or any other symptoms, my patients learn that they need not be defined by their diagnoses.

In addition to my work with individuals, I help couples to untangle their miscommunications and conflicts to regain the underlying understanding, love, and respect that first brought them together.

In my work with families and children, I help parents and children come together and reform the natural parent-child attachments. I assist parents in building a common sense household structure to regain control over their families with respect and love for each member. In addition, I have years of experience navigating the NYC school system to advocate for children and ensure that they have all the resources and accommodations that they need.

My varied background gives me a unique perspective from which to address my patients; having worked not only with the mentally ill professionals, homeless, populations, and special needs children, but also in the literary world, as well as studying philosophy, history, and the classics.

Karen G. Costa - Rosenthal, LMSW has a Bachelor's of Arts in Philosophy and the History of Math and Science from St. John's College, and a Master's in Clinical Social Work from New York University. She also has numerous publications related to spirituality and mental health.

Marnie Kaiser, LMSW

My primary goal as a psychotherapist is to bring out a person’s ability to thrive at their utmost potential. Combining an individualized therapeutic approach with evidence-based practices like cognitive behavioral therapy, I work with individuals to challenge destructive thinking, utilize their strengths, and and not feel defined by their diagnoses.

With the supportive benefits of psychotherapy, I fully believe that everyone can develop the necessary skills to apply in their daily lives. I collaborate with my clients to create a unique “toolbox” comprised of techniques discussed and practiced in each session that they may implement between sessions. Consequently, their competence and future-orientation is enhanced, and they are better able to manage and overcome their mental health challenges.

Often, individuals largely benefit from learning alternative communication skills with their families and loved ones. In these cases, I encourage family therapy where every member has an equal opportunity to speak freely and develop healthier ways to express themselves. Additionally, I engage children in play therapy and create a safe space for expression of all difficult and confusing emotions.

Having experience with a variety of populations including adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and individuals with developmental disabilities, I help individuals of all walks of life meet their unique needs and gain the self-worth they deserve.

Marnie Kaiser, LMSW has a Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from New School University and a Masters in Clinical Social Work from Fordham University.

Erika Calderon, LMSW

I was born and raised in Brooklyn and bilingual in Spanish and English. I obtained a Bachelor's in Psychology from St.John's University and Master's degree in Social Work from New York University.

I am trained in various forms of therapy such as Play therapy from the Institute for Infant, Children and Families, Parenting Journey from The Family Institute,Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress from Adelphi University and Crisis Counseling from Mental Health Association of NYC.

I have worked for 10 yrs as a crisis counselor and 7 yrs as a clinical therapist with an Eclectic Approach while working with adults, children, adolescents, families,couples, and groups having varied concerns.

I like to meet where the client is at in their process and area of need; while using different modalities such as client centered approach, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness techniques, Family Work and Crisis Intervention. I became a social worker with the hopes to impact in any way and be an ally in the change and growth of each person.

Through Psychotherapy we are in a journey and we can get through the process together; you as the expert of your life and I the facilitator of your goals. I hope to inspire and be inspired during the healing process that will assist in your self awareness, self care and personal growth for a better future as individuals and family members.

Nicole Wadler, LMSW

My goal as a therapist lies in helping clients to make the changes in their lives that allow them to look forward to the future with hope. I act as a guide for clients on their journey toward self-awareness and self-discovery. I believe that it is important to have someone to talk with who will really listen and who will accept us as we are without judgment. I work collaboratively with clients to help uncover the strengths and resources we all possess while recognizing what is blocking our way in order to bring about the changes we desire in our lives.

I provide a safe and peaceful space where clients learn new coping skills to enable them to move toward their life goals. I believe that the strengths based, therapeutic alliance can help individuals achieve goals and increase self-esteem and confidence.

I tailor my client-centered counseling style to the unique needs of the individual, couple, child or family and use a variety of therapies such as psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, and mindfulness-based interventions.

Together we can find ways to cope with the stressors of life while moving forward in becoming our best selves.

Nicole Wadler, LMSW has a Bachelors of Arts and Sciences in Psychology and Sociology from Rutgers University and a Masters Degree in Clinical Social Work from Columbia University.

Jim Mindnich, LCSW-R

As a therapist, my goal is helping clients to live life with clarity and intent in all spheres of their increasingly busy and complex lives. Working from a strength-based, positive and affirming perspective, I believe that the therapeutic relationship can be a catalyst for real change and growth. One of the joys of doing this work is helping people discover their innate abilities and then assisting them to use these talents to handle challenging life situations and to develop more meaningful and rewarding interpersonal relationships.

Drawing from a variety of orientations, including cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic theories, and tailored to the clients’s specific needs, I gently guide people toward discarding distorted patterns of thought and embracing their increasing self-awareness that leads to healthier responses to stress and compassion for one self and others.

I have over twenty years of experience in a variety of settings working with people from very diverse backgrounds in an environment of no judgments and positive regard for each individual.

Jim has a Bachelor of Arts from The George Washington University and a Master of Social Work from the Wurzweiler School of Social Work at Yeshiva University.

Rachel Randolph, LMSW

My practice as a clinical social worker and psychotherapist spans over 10 years and includes work with children, adolescents, and adults with a range of symptoms and challenges, including depression, anxiety, trauma, difficulty with relationships, behavioral issues, and loss. My practice is rooted in psychodynamic theory, though I draw on a variety of models to bring clarity to dilemmas and help relieve symptoms.

My style is warm and engaging, and I consider the role of the therapist to be a collaborative one. My approach stems from the belief that there is great value in having one’s story heard and understood. In a safe and confidential environment, we will investigate the experiences, feelings, and questions that brought you to therapy, as well as strategies to help you overcome the obstacles that keep you from living the life you want.

Coming to therapy takes courage, yet it is rewarding. Therapy can help us make new meaning of old stories, make choices with intention and integrity, and cope with our lives with greater compassion for ourselves and those around us.

Rachel Randolph, LMSW, has a graduate degree from Hunter College School of Social Work, and postgraduate certification from New York Institute for Psychotherapy Training.

Marissa Havers, LMSW

My main purpose in conducting psychotherapy is to assist individuals in achieving a more integrated self, free of encumbering negative symptoms that can be so plaguing, and bolstered by a confidence and self love that will serve them in allowing an enriched experience of each area of their life.

The place at which one makes the decision to enter treatment is a rich and valuable one, often born out of a real desire for change, however that may manifest. Therapy can at its best be a school of the self — one in which the patient and therapist collaborate to determine the contents of the self and their personal meaning.

I highly value this relationship and the process that occurs within it. As such, I prioritize providing a safe space (both physically and emotionally) in which I can work collaboratively with each individual to explore what is brought into the room. I believe that it is in a stable, judgement-free zone that one can reach the vulnerability necessary for healing from emotional pain and achieving one’s best self.

I have experience working with diverse array of people and welcome each individual and circumstance to determine treatment modality. I use psychodynamic dialogue, art therapy, play therapy, and other psychotherapeutic modalities to help each individual find their voice and look more deeply within to resolve any conflicts which may restrict happiness, functionality, and fulfillment.

Marissa Havers is an LMSW (Licensed Master of Social Work) with a BFA in Visual and Critical Studies from School of Visual Arts and an MSW from Columbia University in the city of New York.

Meara Bierne, LMSW

I believe in a highly individual and eclectic approach to therapy and I work to engage in treatment that fits each person’s unique needs and goals. I strive to foster a partnership with each individual that respects their own problem-solving style while providing addition tools to address unmet needs. I believe that everyone has strengths and challenges and our work together can fortify those strengths while mitigating challenges thereby reducing stress and suffering in daily life.

I am a therapist with nine years of experience working with children, adults, couples, families, and groups. My areas of expertise have been childhood trauma, sexual abuse, PTSD and bereavement.

Meara has an undergraduate degree in Sociology from Macalester College and a Masters in Clinical Social Work from New York University.

Alexis Samelson, LMSW

When you feel stuck, sad, anxious, or irritable, it can be difficult to ask for help, and hard to imagine how psychotherapy could help. But the opportunity to feel heard and deeply understood is one of the best ways to find relief, solve problems, and ultimately create insight and lasting personal meaning. My aim is to provide a supportive atmosphere where you can examine your thoughts and feelings, relationships, and the issues that get in your way.

My approach is collaborative, transparent and empathic, integrating a variety of psychodynamic, behavioral, and mindfulness techniques tailored to meet your needs. Guided by curiosity and respect, the goal is to create an open dialogue so that together, we can help you whether you are troubled by distressing emotions, the struggle to maintain a healthy relationship with a loved one, or feeling dissatisfied with you career.

I graduated cum laude from Harvard University, received a post-graduate diploma in acting in the U.K. and an MSW from New York University. As a teacher and tutor in elementary through college settings for over 15 years, I have a deep understanding of the particular pressures faced by students and families in a city as intense as New York. I also have experience in the arts, hospitals and community mental health settings. I enjoy working with a broad range of people, and welcome adolescents and adults.

Source:

www.brooklynpsychotherapy.org

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