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Shakespeare Would Cry: 100 Mere Mortal Reviews Of The End Of Eternity - Isbn:9785458968584

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  • Book Title: Shakespeare Would Cry: 100 Mere Mortal Reviews of the End of Eternity
  • ISBN 13: 9785458968584
  • ISBN 10: 5458968581
  • Author: Jason Maxey
  • Category:
  • Category (general): Other
  • Publisher: Lennex
  • Format & Number of pages: 44 pages, book
  • Synopsis: In this book, we have hand-picked the most sophisticated, unanticipated, absorbing (if not at times crackpot!), original and musing book reviews of "The End of Eternity.

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William Shakespeare Popular Poems - Biography Online

William Shakespeare Popular Poems

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

– William Shakespeare – Sonnet 116

From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty’s rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed’st thy light’st flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
Thou that art now the world’s fresh ornament
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content
And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding.
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world’s due, by the grave and thee.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

They that have power to hurt and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow,
They rightly do inherit heaven’s graces
And husband nature’s riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others but stewards of their excellence.
The summer’s flower is to the summer sweet,
Though to itself it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

– William Shakespeare, All the world’s a stage (from As You Like It 2/7)

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. – Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember’d.

– William Shakespeare To be, or not to be (from Hamlet 3/1)

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon’s sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip’s ear.

– William Shakespeare

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love’s coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey’s end in lovers’ meeting–
Every wise man’s son doth know.
What is love? ’tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What’s to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,–
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

– William Shakespeare

When my love swears that she is made of truth
I do believe her, though I know she lies,
That she might think me some untutored youth,
Unlearnèd in the world’s false subtleties.
Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young,
Although she knows my days are past the best,
Simply I credit her false-speaking tongue;
On both sides thus is simple truth suppressed.
But wherefore says she not she is unjust?
And wherefore say not I that I am old?
O, love’s best habit is in seeming trust,
And age in love, loves not to have years told.
Therefore I lie with her, and she with me,
And in our faults by lies we flattered be.

– Sonnet 138
The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works 2nd Edition

The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works 2nd Edition

Shakespeare: The Biography

Source:

www.biographyonline.net

Articles

Eternity Quotes

Shall not this bygone Eden that we knew In our Eternal Life have shape and hue? For where Time is not shall not all Time be? In that calm breast whereto our souls are cleaving Shall we not find our loved ones beyond grieving About the hearth-stone of Eternity?

ALPHONSE DE LAMARTINE, "Memory and Hope"

Beauty is a precarious trace that eternity causes to appear to us and that it takes away from us. A manifestation of eternity, and a sign of death as well. Often it seems to me to be an evil flower of nothingness, or else the cry of the world as it dies, or a desperate, sumptuous prayer.

EUGENE IONESCO, Present Past / Past Present

Time. thou ceaseless lackey to eternity.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, The Rape of Lucrece

Yet some there be that by due steps aspire To lay their just hands on that golden key That opes the palace of Eternity.

JOHN MILTON, Comus

O, dread and dire word. Eternity! What mind of man can understand it?

JAMES JOYCE, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Man passes; he knows that he is dust; nothing is more evident than his frailty. If he should for a single moment forget it, what a chorus of voices would recall it to him! And yet, in the drop of existence which he absorbs, he takes in ages through memory and ages through presentiment. In the moments as they pass, he dimly sees eternity, and more than this, he possesses it by anticipation.

CHARLES WAGNER, Justice

To see eternity was to be exposed to eternity's whims, oppressed by endless dimensions.

FRANK HERBERT, Dune Messiah

The best way to deal with eternity is by living it one day at a time.

I will pause to consider this eternity from which the subsequent ones derive.

JORGE LUIS BORGES, "A History of Eternity"

If we take eternity to mean not infinite temporal duration but timelessness, then eternal life belongs to those who live in the present. Our life has no end in just the way in which our visual field has no limits.

LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN, Tractacus Logico-Philosophicus

Now imagine a mountain of that sand, a million miles high, reaching from the earth to the farthest heavens, and a million miles broad, extending to remotest space, and a million miles in thickness; and imagine such an enormous mass of countless particles of sand multiplied as often as there are leaves in the forest, drops of water in the mighty ocean, feathers on birds, scales on fish, hairs on animals, atoms in the vast expanse of air: and imagine that at the end of every million years a little bird came to that mountain and carried away in its beak a tiny grain of that sand. How many millions upon millions of centuries would pass before that bird had carried away even a square foot of that mountain, how many eons upon eons of ages before it had carried away all? Yet at the end of that immense stretch of time not even one instant of eternity could be said to have ended. At the end of all those billions and trillions of years eternity would have scarcely begun. And if that mountain rose again after it had been all carried away, and if the bird came again and carried it all away again grain by grain, and if it so rose and sank as many times as their are stars in the sky, atoms in the air, drops of water in the sea, leaves upon the trees, feathers upon birds, scales upon fish, hairs upon animals, at the end of all those innumerable risings and sinkings of that immeasurably vast mountain not one single instant of eternity could be said to have ended; even then, at the end of such a period, after that eon of time the mere thought of which makes our very brain real dizzily, eternity would scarcely have begun.

JAMES JOYCE, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Eternity! Didn't it give you the cold shivers?

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS, Summer and Smoke

Source:

www.notable-quotes.com

Shakespeare s Sonnets

The Dedication

The dedication of the sonnets has puzzled readers for centuries. Was it intended by the poet, or is it an unwarranted interpolation put there by the publisher, Thomas Thorpe, without the consent of the author? In fact the possibilities are not endless, and may be narrowed down to just four, given below:

1. The edition was unauthorised by Shakespeare and the dedication is entirely Thorpe's work.

2, The edition was unauthorised by Sh. but the dedication is an adaptation of one that he originally wrote.

3. The edition and the dedication were authorised by Shakespeare.

4. The edition was authorised by Shakespeare but the dedication is entirely Thorpe, without the author's consent.

Most commentaries start with 1 as premise, mainly based on the assumption that the sonnets are too compromising to the man who wrote them, and therefore cannot have been authorised by him. Recent opinion is however swinging round more to 3, that the book and its dedication were done with Shakespeare's full consent.

The chief reason for this change of opinion is the more liberal moral climate which currently prevails, and further considerations of the facts relating to the publishing history of his works. For it is well known that Shakespeare's other poems were published under his auspices and he does not appear to have been in any way reluctant to give them to the world. Indeed Venus and Adonis ran to many editions and was extraordinarily popular at the time. We might also consider that work to be morally compromising if we wished, for it was condemned in its day as an encouragement to masturbation. (See Reading Vernacular Literature by Diana E. Henderson and James Siemen in A Companion to Shakespeare, Blackwells 1999, p.210.)). The Rape of Lucrece was less popular, but it was published with a fulsome dedication by Shakespeare to the Earl of Southampton. The success of these two works coupled with the fact that Shakespeare was the most famous playwright of his day should in theory have ensured the success of whatever he published, and the fact that the sonnets were published in 1609, in a year when the plague in London resulted in the closure of the theatres, gave him the additional pecuniary motive of attempting to recoup some of his lost income.

It is also worthy of consideration that Thomas Thorpe was a respectable publisher who had recently published works by Jonson, Marston and Chapman, and that the invective heaped upon him by those anxious to prove that the sonnets were published in this, a supposedly pirated edition, is undeserved, desperate and unsupported by any evidence.

The main 'evidence' against the sonnets is their supposedly unsavoury character and the conclusion that they could not therefore have been intended by the author for public consumption. However it is only conjecture that he himself, or the circles in which he moved, would have disapproved of them, and at this distance of time it is impossible to say what the circumstances of publication were. If these sonnets are in any way linked to 'his sugred sonnets among his private friends' mentioned by Francis Meres in Palladis Tamia published in 1598, as seems probable, we are entitled to assume that they were much admired, at least by one other writer.

I therefore take the view that the sonnets were published with Shakespeare's full consent, that he was aware of Thorpe's enigmatic dedication, or that he was not available at the time for comment, being away because of the plague, or for other reasons, and that he had every reason to hope that the book would be a success.

(For further discussion of these points see K. Duncan-Jones' introduction to the Arden edition of the Sonnets, and her recently published Ungentle Shakespeare (Arden Shakespeare), pp. 213-8.)

The dedication is grammatically fairly complex and could be re-written as

The well wishing adventurer, (T.T), in setting forth these ensuing sonnets, wisheth to the only begetter, Mr. W. H. all happiness, and that eternity promised by our ever living poet. TO. THE .ONLIE. BEGETTER. OF.

The natural sense of this line is 'to the one who alone inspired' these sonnets, that is, the beautiful youth, who is hymned in most of them. It refers forward to Mr. W. H. in line 3. Portraying the beloved as the sole motive and mover of the lover's thoughts was commonplace in the sonnet tradition, and Shakespeare subscribes to the idea in several places in these sonnets, e.g.

O know, sweet love, I always write of you,
And you and love are still my argument. 76.

Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteem,
And gives thy pen both skill and argument. 100.

For to no other pass my verses tend
Than of your graces and your gifts to tell; 103.

Poet's often referred to their poems as children of their brain, and a child requires a begetter.

Other commentators have preferred to interpret 'begetter' as 'the one who obtained the manuscript for me'. If, as has been suggested frequently, this book is a pirated and unauthorised printing of the sonnets, it seems unlikely that Thorpe would choose to trumpet the fact to the world and praise the one who had stolen the manuscript. The entire credit of the book and its salesworthiness depended on people believing that it was genuine Shakespeare. To give the game away that it was a stolen copy and not necessarily even by Shakespeare would have undermined its potential attraction to readers, not to mention the damage it might do to Thorpe himself as a publisher. Would he really wish to have portrayed himself as a purloiner of other men's works?

The word 'begetter' is not used by Shakespeare either in the plays or poems. However he does use 'beget' (23 times), 'begets' (7 times) and 'begotten' (4 times), either with literal meanings of 'to father, to create, to procreate.', or in a metaphoric sense. He does not use it to signify 'to procure'. The absence of the word 'begetter' in the corpus could signify that Shakespeare did not have a hand in writing this dedication (it is signed by Thomas Thorpe). However that does not show that he thereby disapproved of it. Probably he enjoyed its puzzling ambiguity and was quite happy to have it attached to the poems, as it hid the dedicatee's name from all those who were not already in the secret, and left open the possibility that all might be revealed in time.

See the additional notes for further discussion of the onlie begetter.

THESE. INSVING. SONNETS.

insuing = ensuing, following.

Not all of the sonnets that follow are written to the man, but it could be argued that, without the original impulse to write the first ones, no others would have been written. Sonnets 1-126 are addressed to the youth, if not directly so, at least by implication. Of the 28 that follow to the mistress, in three of them the youth is deeply implicated, so that only 25 out of more than 150 are addressed to the 'Dark Lady'. Even these could be regarded as supplementary to the main body, as they depict a less than ideal love in contrast to that which has already been amply shown to be divine in the preceding 126.

VV. H. ALL .HAPPINESSE.

There are many candidates who have been put forward for the honour of being referred to by these intials, the two most prominent being Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, to whom both Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece are dedicated; and William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, to whom the First Folio is dedicated. In the dedication to The Rape of Lucrece Shakespeare writes:

RIGHT HONOURABLE HENRY WRIOTHESLEY,

EARLE OF SOUTHAMPTON AND BARON OF TITCHFIELD.

The love I dedicate to your Lordship is without end: wherof this Pamphlet without beginning is but a superfluous Moity. The warrant I have of your Honourable disposition, not the worth of my untutord Lines, makes it assured of acceptance. What I have done is yours, what I have to doe is yours, being part in all I have, devoted yours. Were my worth greater my duety would shew greater, meane time, as it is, it is bound to your Lordship; To whom I wish long life still lengthned with all happinesse.

Your Lordships in all duety.

Such a fulsome dedication is unparalleled in Elizabethan literature, and clearly betokens a close friendship. Hence many have thought that he might be the youth addressed in the sonnets, especially as he is also known to have been reluctant to marry, and to have turned down several proposed matches.

However one of the great difficulties attached to Southampton being the 'lovely boy' is that he was too old, as he would have been 26 in 1600, and at that date it is quite probable that many of the sonnets had not yet been written. Even if they were written at the end of the century, he would still be too old for many of the compliments addressed to him, and his marriage would not have helped matters. The fact that his initials are H.W. rather than W.H. also counts against him, although the reversal could have been a deliberate part of the enigma of the dedication.

The other main contender is William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke. (1580-1630). (See his coat of arms opposite). He would have been in his late teens when the so called procreation sonnets (1-20) might have been written, perhaps from 1597-1599, and he is known to have rejected several proposed marriages. He came from a renowned literary family, a supporter of the theatres through its own company of actors (Pembroke's men), and he is renowned as having the First Folio dedicated to him by Heminge and Condell in 1623. (The First Folio is the first work containing all of Shakespeare's plays published by two of his fellow actors, Heminge and Condell, some years after his death).

Many other names have been put forward, including the poet himself, the W.H. being supposedly a misprint for W.S.

It is worth remembering that dogmatism in these matters is out of place, since we do not have the documentary evidence to settle the identity of W.H. or to be certain that he is the same person as the young man addressed in the sonnets.

AND .THAT. ETERNITIE.

Many of the sonnets promise eternal fame to the youth. E.g.

Your name from hence immortal life shall have,
Though I, once gone, to all the world must die; 81.

See also 18, 19, 60, 63, 101.

PROMISED.
BY OVR. EVER-LIVING. POET.

Ever-living - famous, immortal.

Shakespeare was in 1609 famous both as a poet and a playwright. His Venus and Adonis had run through several editions, and many of his plays were printed in Quarto versions, besides being well known to the theatre going public of the time. The epithet ever-living would have been considered appropriate for a poet who was already well known, and poets by tradition claimed immortality for themselves and their verses.

wisheth - the subject is the adventurer below. He desires that eternity be bestowed upon 'the onlie begetter '.

applied to the adventurer, who wishes success to his own venture (of publishing).

adventurer = one who undertakes a risky venture; a bold and energetic person, explorer, thinker. Thorpe may have been worried that the book was a risky undertaking. The word could also apply to the book itself. Since ancient times poets thought of themselves as sending their children (their poems) to venture forth in the world. See for example Catullus' poem to Cornelius about his new book:

Cui dono lepidum novum libellum
arida modo pumice expolitum?
Corneli, tibi: namque tu solebas
meas esse aliquid putare nugas
iam tum, cum ausus es unus Italorum
omne aevum tribus explicare cartis
doctis, Iuppiter, et laboriosis.
quare habe tibi quidquid hoc libelli
qualecumque; quod, patrona virgo
plus uno maneat perenne saeclo.

To whom should I give this, my new book,
Polished but now with dry pumice stone?
To you Cornelius; for you were accustomed
To think something of my silly trifles,
Even then when you alone of Italians had dared
To set forth our whole history in three tomes,
Learned ones by God, and of much labour.
So please accept this book, this nothing,
Whatever it be. And O virgin Muse, I beseech you,
Let it survive fresh in men's minds for at least a century.

setting forth - publishing. OED gives this meaning under set 144 d and e.
144d - to promulgate, publish, issue ( a regulation, proclamation etc.).
144e - to publish (a literary work). Thus, Greene 1590 I have. set forth many Pamphlets, full of much love and litle scholarism.

The meaning therefore would be 'the publisher, in publishing this work, wishes etc.' But the cryptic phrasing suggests also that the wishes are directed not only to the onlie begetter. but also to the book itself, which is a sort of adventurer in the vast sea of the world and its fortunes.

Thomas Thorpe. It is almost impossible that Shakespeare would not have known him, since he had only recently published works by Jonson, Marston and Chapman. With Jonson's works especially a great deal of care had been taken to provide an accurate text, and it is probable that Thorpe had gained the reputation of being a considerate and responsible publisher. It is probable also that he offered good prices to well known authors. There is no evidence to indicate that he made a habit of stealing literary manuscripts.

Copyright 2001-2014 © of this site belongs to Oxquarry Books Ltd

Source:

www.shakespeares-sonnets.com

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564-1616). English poet and playwright – Shakespeare is widely considered to be the greatest writer in the English language. He wrote 38 plays and 154 sonnets. Shakespeare’s poems consider themes of love, beauty, death, decay and the inevitable passing of time.

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments; love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no, it is an ever-fixèd mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his heighth be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

Sonnet 116
William Shakespeare

Love Sonnet 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

– William Shakespeare

Love Sonnet 29

When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries
And look upon myself and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featur’d like him, like him with friends possess’d,
Desiring this man’s art and that man’s scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven’s gate;
For thy sweet love remember’d such wealth brings
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

– William Shakespeare

All the World’s a Stage

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

– William Shakespeare

O never say that I was false of heart

O, never say that I was false of heart,
Though absence seemed my flame to qualify.
As easy might I from my self depart
As from my soul which in thy breast doth lie.
That is my home of love; if I have ranged,
Like him that travels I return again,
Just to the time, not with the time exchanged,
So that myself bring water for my stain.
Never believe though in my nature reigned
All frailties that besiege all kinds of blood,
That it could so preposterously be stained
To leave for nothing all thy sum of good;
For nothing this wide universe I call
Save thou, my rose, in it thou art my all

Sonnet 109
by William Shakespeare

Take, Oh Take Those Lips Away

TAKE, O take those lips away
That so sweetly were forsworn,
And those eyes, the break of day,
Lights that do mislead the morn:
But my kisses bring again,
Bring again—
Seals of love, but seal’d in vain,
Seal’d in vain!

– William Shakespeare

Love Sonnet 1

From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty’s rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed’st thy light’s flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
Thou that art now the world’s fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak’st waste in niggarding:
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world’s due, by the grave and thee.

– William Shakespeare

Source:

www.shortpoems.org

Title - Guild Wars 2 Wiki (GW2W)

Title

Titles are rewards for completing various in-game objectives, for example completing personal storylines. certain achievements. and from the Hall of Monuments. All titles in Guild Wars 2 are purely cosmetic and offer no benefits other than showing them. Some titles such as Dungeon Master or Gladiator mark milestones as progress towards other achievements is unlocked. Titles are unlocked account-wide, but a different title can be selected for each character. If selected, a title will appear in white text under the name of the character whenever the name is visible. To show character names without selecting them press the "Targeting: Show [. ] Names" keys (default Left Alt for allies and Left Ctrl for enemies and objects), or activate the corresponding "Show all [. ] names" options in the General Options panel. The list of unlocked titles can be found left of Achievements window.

List of titles [ edit ]

In-game titles can be earned by completing certain achievement tracks.

Source:

wiki.guildwars2.com

NoSQL for Mere Mortals

Author: Dan Sullivan
Publisher: Wiley
Date: April 16, 2015
Pages: 552
ISBN: 9780134023212
Print: 0134023218
Kindle: B00VO27P1K
Audience: Techies learning about NoSQL
Rating: 4

Reviewer: Kay Ewbank

Confused about the range of options on offer from NoSQL? Will this book help you?

NoSQL is a topic that covers a variety of technologies, and for which many claims are made. Translating those promises into working systems is quite a lot harder, as is working out just what is really on offer. In this lucid guide Dan Sullivan goes through the major types of database under the NoSQL umbrella, explaining the advantages and drawbacks of each in turn. There’s a reasonable amount of explanatory code snippets used throughout the book, and while the material is accessible to non-programmers, developers will it useful too.

Sullivan begins the book with an analysis of the different types of databases, their advantages and limitations – flat files, relational databases, and NoSQL. The descriptions are clear, and if you don’t already know what the different options do, could be useful. Next comes a chapter on the different varieties of NoSQL databases, which is more generally useful. Sullivan looks at distributed databases, the compromise between ACID (Atomic, Consistent, Isolated, Durable) and BASE (Basically Available, Soft state, Eventually consistent). There’s a nice description of the types of ‘eventually consistent’ choices that have been made, and the chapter closes with a look at four types of NoSQL database – key-value pairs, documents, column family, and graph databases.

The book then moves on to consider each of these four types of database in turn, starting with key-value databases. I quite liked Sullivan’s description of arrays being like key-value stores with training wheels, and he carries the analogy on quite cleverly, with associative arrays being the equivalent of taking off the training wheels, and caches being adding gears to the bike. There are good descriptions of how to construct keys and use them to locate values, and of the essential features of key-value databases. A chapter on key-value database terminology sorts out the definitions, and this section ends with a chapter on designing for key-value databases where aspects such as partitioning, handling structured values, and more detail on the limitations are all well covered.

The next type of database to be discussed is the document database, starting with a detailed intro of what a document database is and how it is used to manage multiple documents. The terminology gets its own chapter, and this section ends with a look at how to design for document databases, taking into account how to manage joins, and planning for mutable documents. There’s an interesting discussion of ‘the Goldilocks zone of indexes’ and how to get just the right size for read-heavy and write-heavy applications.

Column family indexes come next, starting with Google BigTable and including discussions of HBase and Cassandra. As with the other sections, there’s a chapter on the terminology of column family databases, and the section ends with a chapter on designing for column family databases. This latter chapter includes some useful material on the tools for working with big data, some extract, transform and load (ETL) tools, and some analysis options including statistics, machine learning, and general analysis tools.

Graph databases are the last group to get the treatment. I found this probably the most interesting section, with a really good discussion on querying graphs. This looked at Cypher for declarative querying, and Gremlin for query by graph traversal. There’s also useful section on tips for graph database design and traps to avoid.

The final part of the book looks at how to choose a database for your application, and how to use NoSQL and relational databases together. There are some useful bits, but I don’t think there’s enough detail to help you reach a final decision, more put together a shortlist.

I thought this book took an even-handed approach to the different types of NoSQL database, and gave clear explanations of why and when you might use them. If you read it starting from a position of confusion, by the end you should know which type of database you might choose. You’d still need to do more reading and research before putting data into database, but you’d know a lot more than when you started.

See Kay Ewbank's 5-star review of another title in this series: Database Design for Mere Mortals and her reviews of:

Source:

www.i-programmer.info

Pillars of Eternity for PC Reviews

  • Summary: Eternity aims to recapture the magic, imagination, depth, and nostalgia of classic RPG's that Obsidian enjoyed making - and playing. Eternity takes the central hero, memorable companions and the epic exploration of Baldur’s Gate, adds in the fun, intense combat and dungeon diving of Icewind Eternity aims to recapture the magic, imagination, depth, and nostalgia of classic RPG's that Obsidian enjoyed making - and playing. Eternity takes the central hero, memorable companions and the epic exploration of Baldur’s Gate, adds in the fun, intense combat and dungeon diving of Icewind Dale, and ties it all together with the emotional writing and mature thematic exploration of Planescape: Torment. Choose to play as one of the six playable races: Human, Aumaua, Dwarf, Elf, Godlike, and Orlan. Whether you're playing a stout Dwarf, a towering Aumaua, or one of the otherworldly Godlike, Eternity's plethora of playable races scratch every role-playing itch you may have and allow for deep character customization. [Obsidian] … Expand

I like nearly everything in this game. The storytelling is probably one of my favorite aspects of this game, where it is told nearly like a I like nearly everything in this game. The storytelling is probably one of my favorite aspects of this game, where it is told nearly like a book. Pillars of Eternity has one of the best writing I've ever seen in a game and it's wonderfully executed, both in dialogue and in storytelling. It's an amazingly well-written story throughout the game. You'll also meet other characters in your travels, with interesting backgrounds and side-quests, also with an amazing dialogue.

Graphically it reminds me of Baldur's Gate, with new-end graphics. I love how the game looks, it's truly a beautiful game, where the world looks like something from a painting. Character customisation is quite bad, but it's just a small part of the game.

Sidequesting in Pillars was actually really fun! It wasn't those fetch missions, it was of the same quality as the main quest, with choices and consequences. Most of the sidequest had moral choices for your character that would build up what type of character he/she is, which makes you able to decide if you're a hero or a villain. Interesting all the way through. The party you choose to have with you is also affected by what you decide to do during this moral choices and might dislike you for it, and even leave you.

I loved the combat. It's challenging and fun. Depending on what moves you do, where you place your characters and what spells you use to certain enemies you might die or win. If you play on the higher difficulties, side questing is a must to be able to continue. You even might meet a powerful enemy you can't defeat at the moment, but after doing more quest you can return to and defeat, and it feels really good in doing so. Looting for gear was one of the things I found quite lacking, often I got bad gear from a hard enemy, but the semi-hard bosses gave me gear I used for the most part of the game. It was not much gear changing.

And oh yeah, THE MUSIC IS SO GOOD! It feels like a classic RPG from start to end! … Expand

I like it, but there are so many flaws. The one thing that keeps me playing it, is the story/stories, even if it can become very confusing at I like it, but there are so many flaws. The one thing that keeps me playing it, is the story/stories, even if it can become very confusing at times. I feel combat has been ruined by confusing terminology, math, and mechanics. Too much magic which you never can use, too few meaningful weapons/armour upgrades. Many things in the game prove to be practically meaningless, but then there are some things you can miss which makes it very difficult. This game could have been so much better, so it's clearly not a 10. … Expand

Not ready for release. Everything about this game is great except for the astonishing number of bugs. I get an average of 2-4 CTDs (Crash to Not ready for release. Everything about this game is great except for the astonishing number of bugs. I get an average of 2-4 CTDs (Crash to Desktop) per hour. Also there are a lot of minor bugs in the UI and regular gameplay, but the result of seeing all of these little things (and a few rather large things) go wrong really hamstrings what would otherwise be a spectacular gaming experience. Art direction, writing, sound design, combat mechanics, overall mood and story coherence are unprecedentedly good. Better than Dragon Age, TES, etc. I came to this game from Arcanum, and playing PoE (when it isn't crashing/freezing/bugging out) is like a perfect realization of everything that Arcanum wanted to be. Obsidian, call me when you've put reasonable effort into making it stable. … Expand

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