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Death In Kashmir - Isbn:9781471900327

Category: Fiction

  • Book Title: Death in Kashmir
  • ISBN 13: 9781471900327
  • ISBN 10: 1471900320
  • Author: M. M. Kaye
  • Category: Fiction
  • Category (general): Fiction
  • Publisher: Hachette UK
  • Format & Number of pages: 256 pages, book
  • Synopsis: On learning the real truth about her death, Sarah is plunged into a deadly intrigue of secret messages, mysterious rendezvous - and murder. A delicious blend of menace and romance set against the background of M. M. Kaye's beloved India.

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ISBN: 0312263104 - Death In Kashmir: A Mystery - OPENISBN Project: Download Book Data

Death In Kashmir: A Mystery

When young Sarah Parrish takes a skiing vacation to Gulmarg, a resort nestled in the mountains above the fabled Vale of Kashmir, she anticipates an entertaining but uneventful stay. But when she discovers that the deaths of two in her party are the reuslt of foul play, she finds herself entrusted with a mission of unforseen importance. And when she leaves the ski slopes for the Waterwitch, a private houseboat on the placid shores of the Dal Lake near Srinagar, she discovers to her horror that the killer will stop at nothing to prevent Sarah from piecing the puzzle together.

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Articles

Death Walked in Kashmir (Death in, book 1) by M M Kaye

Death Walked in Kashmir

When young Sarah Parrish takes a skiing vacation to Gulmarg, a resort nestled in the mountains above the fabled Vale of Kashmir, she anticipates an entertaining but uneventful stay. But when she discovers that the deaths of two in her party are the reuslt of foul play, she finds herself entrusted with a mission of unforseen importance. And when she leaves the ski slopes for the Waterwitch, a private houseboat on the placid shores of the Dal Lake near Srinagar, she discovers to her horror that the killer will stop at nothing to prevent Sarah from piecing the puzzle together.

Used availability for M M Kaye's Death Walked in Kashmir

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Hardback Editions

September 2012. UK Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 1-4719-0032-0 / 978-1-4719-0032-7 (UK edition)
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co (Digital)
Availability: Amazon Amazon CA

September 1994. USA Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-670-90761-8 / 978-0-670-90761-8 (USA edition)
Publisher: Claremont
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

April 1988. USA Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-517-61006-X / 978-0-517-61006-0 (USA edition)
Publisher: Outlet
Availability: Amazon UK

January 1986. UK Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-7089-1401-2 / 978-0-7089-1401-4 (UK edition)
Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print Books Ltd
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

November 1984. USA Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-670-80032-5 / 978-0-670-80032-2 (USA edition)
Publisher: Viking
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

October 1984. USA Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-312-18617-7 / 978-0-312-18617-3 (USA edition)
Publisher: St Martins Pr
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

1984. USA Hardback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-89621-614-4 / 978-0-89621-614-3 (USA edition)
Publisher: Thorndike Press
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

Paperback Editions

2012. UK Paperback

Title: Death in Kashmir (Murder Room)
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 1-4719-0033-9 / 978-1-4719-0033-4 (UK edition)
Publisher: The Murder Room
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

December 2000. USA Paperback

Title: Death in Kashmir: A Mystery
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-312-26310-4 / 978-0-312-26310-2 (USA edition)
Publisher: Minotaur Books
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

July 1985. UK Paperback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): Mary Margaret Kaye
ISBN: 0-14-006407-9 / 978-0-14-006407-0 (UK edition)
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

July 1985. USA Paperback

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-312-90111-9 / 978-0-312-90111-0 (USA edition)
Publisher: St Martins Mass Market Paper
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

Audio Editions

February 2013. USA Audio edition

Title: Death in Kashmir: A Mystery
Author(s): M M Kaye
Publisher: Audible Studios
Availability: Amazon

February 2013. UK Audio edition

Title: Death in Kashmir: A Mystery
Author(s): M M Kaye
Publisher: Audible Studios
Availability: Amazon UK

March 1989. UK Audio Cassette

Title: Death in the Kashmir: Complete & Unabridged
Author(s): M M Kaye
ISBN: 0-7451-6082-4 / 978-0-7451-6082-5 (UK edition)
Publisher: Chivers Audio Books
Availability: Amazon Amazon UK Amazon CA

Kindle Editions

December 2015. USA Kindle edition

Title: Death in Kashmir: A Mystery
Author(s): M M Kaye
Publisher: Minotaur Books
Availability: Amazon

September 2012. Canada Kindle edition

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
Publisher: Orion
Availability: Amazon CA

September 2012. UK Kindle edition

Title: Death in Kashmir
Author(s): M M Kaye
Publisher: The Murder Room
Availability: Amazon UK

Source:

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Death in Kashmir by M

Death in Kashmir

Written by celebrated author M. M. Kaye, Death in Kasmir is a wonderfully evocative mystery.

When young Sarah Parrish takes a skiing vacation to Gulmarg, a resort nestled in the mountains above the fabled Vale of Kashmir, she anticipates anMore Written by celebrated author M. M. Kaye, Death in Kasmir is a wonderfully evocative mystery.

When young Sarah Parrish takes a skiing vacation to Gulmarg, a resort nestled in the mountains above the fabled Vale of Kashmir, she anticipates an entertaining but uneventful stay. But when she discovers that the deaths of two in her party are the result of foul play, she finds herself entrusted with a mission of unforeseen importance. And when she leaves the ski slopes for the Waterwitch, a private houseboat on the placid shores of the Dal Lake near Srinagar, she discovers to her horror that the killer will stop at nothing to prevent Sarah from piecing the puzzle together. Less

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Community Reviews

Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ rated it it was amazing

about 1 year ago

This was a fun, old-fashioned whodunnit, complete with exotic location, intrepid heroine and steely-eyed hero. And now I really want to visit Kashmir.

mark monday rated it liked it

over 1 year ago

3 Things about Death in Kashmir :

(1) beautiful opening chapter! wonderfully suspenseful and eerie. a moonlit place in a foreign land full of empty spaces. briskly evocative of an off-kilter period, a time and place that is fading away and being changed into something new.

Hannah rated it it was amazing

My very favorite of M.M. Kaye's 6 " Death in. " murder mysteries, and quite possibly my favorite whodunit of all time. While her mysteries haven't the same scope and reach of her 3 masterpieces (The Far Pavillions. Shadow of the Moon and Trade Wind ), they are nonetheles. Read full review

Moonlight Reader rated it really liked it

I read M.M. Kaye when I was in my teens, first picking up The Far Pavilions, and then stumbling on these mysteries later. I can't remember which of the mysteries I read - perhaps all of them, perhaps only a few, but it has been long enough that they are basically new to m. Read full review

Diane Lynn rated it it was amazing

over 3 years ago

Really 4.5 stars

This book, by one of my favorite authors, takes the reader to India at the very end of the British Raj. It takes place in 1947 just before partition. Sarah Parrish travels to Gulmarg in Kashmir for a ski holiday. There are many interesting characters at th. Read full review

Erika Nerdypants rated it really liked it

about 5 years ago

This is one of my most loved books. It's true that I have read deeper books with more substance, even in the mystery genre. But M.M. Kaye wrote a top notch mystery for her time. She truly transports the reader to Kashmir, I could feel the house boat rocking as I was turni. Read full review

Christopher Bunn rated it really liked it

over 4 years ago

M. M. Kaye certainly knows how to write, and her upbringing in India lends legitimacy to how she paints her scenes in this one. There's a very short list of authors (women, mostly) who wrote excellent books grouped mostly in the thriller-suspense-murder mystery-mild roman. Read full review

Margaret rated it really liked it

almost 6 years ago

I wish I could see Kashmir as this book puts it down! Not to mention all the strange British types lurking about. The book was begun in Detroit Metro Airport, finished on CalTrain somewhere between San Francisco and Palo Alto. A great 6 hour read, now on to more MM Kaye. Read full review

Bev rated it liked it

about 1 year ago

Death Walked in Kashmir (originally published as Death Walked in Kashmir, 1953) takes place in a region now under Indian control (with other portions of the Kashmir area controlled by Pakistan and China). The time is 1947 and Britain is preparing to leave India and lose p. Read full review

Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson rated it really liked it

over 2 years ago

M.M. Kaye was born in India and spent much of her life traveling the world with her husband who was with the British Embassy. She is best known for The Far Pavilions and wrote a number of mysteries set in exotic locales. The descriptions of the settings in this mystery ar. Read full review

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www.goodreads.com

Death in Kashmir by M

Death in Kashmir (1953)

Sarah Parrish just wants to enjoy her relaxing holiday at a ski hotel in Kashmir, but her vacation takes an unpleasant turn when one of the other hotel patrons is found dead. Everyone believes that Mrs. Matthews’ death was an accident, until Sarah discovers that another hotel guest, Janet Rushton, is actually a British Intelligence agent – and that she and Mrs. Matthews were working together. When Janet herself dies “accidentally” shortly thereafter, Sarah is plunged into a mysterious network of criminal intrigue and espionage. But the more she learns about the sinister plot that Janet had uncovered, the more dangerous her own search becomes.

This was my first book by M. M. Kaye, but it definitely won’t be my last. Death in Kashmir is an entertaining cozy mystery set a year before India gained its independence from Britain – so, in addition to the mystery plot, the book documents a significant cultural shift from the perspective of the British occupants. And since M. M. Kaye actually did live in Kashmir for a while, her descriptions of the country are (most likely) accurate! The mystery was well done also; there was a comfortable number of suspects, and I didn’t discover who the villain was until Sarah did. Overall, the novel reminded me strongly of Agatha Christie’s books, and I think anyone who likes Christie will like M. M. Kaye as well. I’ll have to go find Death in Berlin now!

M. M. Kaye's Death in Kashmir attempts to combine a murder mystery with international intrigue. Agatha Christie's foray into mystery + international intrigue was not successful (see Passenger to Frankfurt ), and I was a little dubious about Kaye's ability to shine where Christie had faltered. Though the international intrigue element is probably the weakest part of the plot, it wasn't bad enough to make me put the book down.

Sarah Parrish is a young woman who served as a WRAF in World War II. Now that the war is over, she is at loose ends; her parents are dead and she is on her own. It's 1946 and India is shortly to be emancipated from British rule after a century and a half. While skiing with a party in Kashmir, Sarah is unexpectedly pulled into the confidence of Janet, a Secret Service person with something terribly important to protect. When Janet is killed — accidentally, as it looks, though Sarah knows it is murder — Sarah is left with the only clue to Janet's secret. But how can she do anything when she doesn't even know what the secret is about — and when the opposition is so skilled at arranging convenient deaths as needed?

We get a wonderful snapshot of life in India just before its emancipation, by a person who was really there. Kaye spent her childhood and early married life in India, where her grandfather, father, brother, and husband all served the British Raj (or "reign") there. Her attention to detail, down to the pronunciation of the various Indian terms and place names, is commendable and adds greatly to the verisimilitude of the setting. Kaye's deep love for India is apparent in the descriptions of its beauty and culture.

The dialogue in this mystery is wickedly witty and funny. Major Hugo Creed and his wife Fudge are such fun. His speeches are my favorite:

"I know of few more invigorating pastimes than watching one's fellow man earnestly endeavoring to remain upright while sliding down a snow slope of one-in-one with six feet of planking strapped to his boots." (p. 33)

"You will undoubtedly meet the lady at the binge tomorrow, and be able to judge for yourself. Speaking for myself, she fascinates me, and I cannot help regretting that upon her demise it will not be practicable to have her stuffed and placed in some public museum." (p. 101)

Sarah is also fun to listen to; her conversation is peppered with literary allusions and quotes, and she has a lively sense of humor. Lady Candera — perhaps so named because of her alarming candor — is also hilarious (though perhaps less fun if one were to meet her in real life). The narrative voice is fairly distinctive, subtly clever and occasionally reflective. Kaye writes in the introduction of "man's compulsive and indefatigable efforts to destroy what is beautiful." I'm not so sure she's wrong.

But despite all the good things, there were some flaws in the story. The international intrigue was a bit of a stretch, and even at the end it was vague. Still, it could have been worse. The romance was predictable, and Charles a rather one-dimensional character. A nice one-dimensional character (of admirable dimensions too, I understand!) but something about that fell flat for me. Maybe because it was so perfect? All the women for miles around try their wiles on him, Sarah included, because he is such a paragon of good looks and manners — and he conveniently turns out to be, well, what he is, and ends up with Sarah? I don't want to give too much away, but it's just too neat. The characters also spill things on themselves and others quite a bit, I noticed. It got rather funny as it kept happening.

Oh, I remembered one other thing I didn't like. Charles and Sarah are discussing a mutual acquaintance and Sarah says, "This is the Atom Age—more's the pity—and anyone as spineless as Meril Forbes should be dumped straight back into a Brontë novel where she belongs" (p. 186). Excuse me? The heroines of Brontë novels are anything but spineless, thank you very much! I'm not sure why Kaye made that dig, but it was annoying — enough to lop off that extra half-star I couldn't decide if I should give it. Off it comes.

There are red herrings aplenty, but I had my suspicions about the criminal right from the start. Though I suspected some other people too along the way, I was never quite fooled by the blind Kaye puts up. I'm not sure what I like better: figuring it out beforehand or having the wool pulled thoroughly over my eyes. Both are fun when it comes to murder mysteries!

Death in Kashmir is the first Kaye book I've read, and I will certainly be looking for more of her work. The characters are fun, the dialogue witty, the mystery passable, and the historical setting believable. Recommended! ( )

Wonderful, for what it is - a light-hearted whodunit with a clever, complex and suspenseful mystery, interesting and rich historical context (politically, culturally and scenically), a charming heroine and a romantic plot (and hero!) which never fails to amuse.

Sarah's holiday in late-1940s India, hijacked by suspense and intrigue makes for gripping entertainment. ( )

▾ Book descriptions

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312263104. Paperback)

When young Sarah Parrish takes a skiing vacation to Gulmarg, a resort nestled in the mountains above the fabled Vale of Kashmir, she anticipates an entertaining but uneventful stay. But when she discovers that the deaths of two in her party are the reuslt of foul play, she finds herself entrusted with a mission of unforseen importance. And when she leaves the ski slopes for the Waterwitch, a private houseboat on the placid shores of the Dal Lake near Srinagar, she discovers to her horror that the killer will stop at nothing to prevent Sarah from piecing the puzzle together.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:08 -0400)

▾ Library descriptions

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Catalog Record: Socialist ideas & movements in Kashmir

Catalog Record: Socialist ideas & movements in Kashmir, 1919-1947 | Hathi Trust Digital Library

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The Practical Nomad

  1. Why do I care about Kashmir?
  2. Overview: Kashmir, self-determination, and human rights (printable PDF version)
  3. Links to documents and background material
1. Why do I care about Kashmir?

(If you are looking for my overview of the Kashmir issue, rather than my personal story, read this. If you want to hear it from Kashmiris, rather than from me as a white European-American, watch this .)

My interests and activism on issues of peace and human rights, and my work as a travel consultant and travel writer, first intersected for me on a 1989 trip to Kashmir.

My mother's parents and grandparents spent most of their lives as expatriates in South Asia. where my grandfather and great-grandfather taught at American-sponsored universities. My mother was born in Lahore, Punjab, in what was then a province of British-ruled India and is now Pakistan. Until the independence and partition of India and Pakistan, they spent their summer vacations in the Kashmir Valley. Kashmir would later become a major tourist destination, but at that time, there were still relatively few foreign visitors or tourists there.

My maternal grandparents lived through Partition in Lahore. They didn't choose Pakistan over India, but stayed on in Lahore because that was where their lives and careers were. After Partition, they spent most of their summer vacations around Murree, in the portion of the former Kashmir "state" on the Pakistan-controlled side of the "Line of Control" (cease-fire line) dividing the portions of Kashmir controlled by Pakistan and by India. But I grew up with my grandmother's watercolors and stories of their summer camp on Nagin Lake in Srinagar. It was with joy that I first went there in 1989, together with my partner and and my Lahore-born but USA-raised mother. We visited both sides of the Line of Control in Kashmir on that trip, as well as other parts of both India and Pakistan. In the Kashmir Valley, we were hoping for a restful vacation within a longer trip that had included some hard traveling elsewhere.

As it happened, our arrival in the Kashmir Valley in 1989 coincided with the outbreak of the latest stage of the Kashmiri nationalist struggle. It started mainly as a movement for self-determination, and its tactics were those of nonviolent civil disobedience. But as the Indian government responded with crude repression, it increasingly became a campaign for human rights and simple survival. An army of half a million Indian soldiers, police, and spies now occupies most of Kashmir and enforces martial law over ten million Kashmiris. At least thirty thousand and perhaps as many as seventy thousand Kashmiris have been killed since 1989, including many medical and human rights workers and Kashmir's most-respected spiritual leader. Despite some attempts at armed retaliation by Kashmiri guerrillas and terrorists, most of the killing has been done by Indian soldiers, police, and death squads.

While in Kashmir, quite by chance, I met and talked about the situation with the "Mirwaiz" (a title of spiritual leadership unique to Kashmir) of Kashmir, Mohammed Farooq. I was extremely impressed with his modesty, deference to the will of the people, and recognition of the distinction between his roles as spiritual and political leader. About six months later, Mirwaiz Mohammed Farooq was assassinated by an Indian army death squad. No public funeral was permitted, and an unauthorized funeral procession was machine-gunned by Indian troops, killing more than a hundred people. After the assassination of Mohammed Farooq, his son, Umar Farooq, succeeded him as Mirwaiz.

In the years of martial law that followed, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq used his position, and the minimal tolerance of the Indian regime for religious gatherings even during periods when all other popular gatherings were prohibited (common under martial-law regimes), to catalyze the formation of the All Parties Hurriyat (Freedom) Conference (APHC) as an umbrella nationalist organization and shadow government, of which he was selected as chairman.

Unlike the Dalai Lama of Tibet, with whom he might be compared as the spiritual and political leader of a nation under occupation, Mirwaiz Omar Farooq remained in Kashmir even after his father's assassination. This is commendable, and has kept the APHC much more responsive to the Kashmiri people than it would have become in exile. But it has severely hampered his ability to promote the Kashmiri cause to the world. In April of 1999, for example, with Mirwaiz Umar Farooq under house arrent by the Indian authorities, a delegation of other representatives of the APHC was detained at the airport in New Delhi (India permits no direct air service from Kashmir to anywhere outside India) and prevented from boarding a flight to Geneva to present the Kashmiri case to the U.N. Commission on Human Rights. And again in September 1999, Mirwaiz Omar Farooq and another senior leader of the APHC were detained at the airport in New Delhi, their passports and tickets confiscated, and prevented from boarding a flight to New York to present Kashmir's case to the world and the American people.

If anyone is interested in what Mirwaiz Umar Farooq of Kashmir, and other representatives of the Kashmiri people, might have said, had they been allowed to travel to the U.S. and the U.N. and to speak to us directly, here's a transcript of an earlier address to a U.N. subcommittee (several years ago, but unfortunately the situation has not improved since then).

As for the voices of more ordinary Kashmiris, Jashn-e-Azadi. a documentary film by Sanjay Kak (himself from a Hindu "Pandit" family of Kashmiri ancestry), provides one of the best available opportunities to hear Kashmiris speak for themselves, with footage both from interviews in 2004-2005 and anonymous archival "home video" from the 1990's. Basharat Peer's Curfewed Night: One Kashmiri Journalist's Frontline Account of Life, Love, and War in His Homeland is a down-to-earth memoir of growing up in the Kashmir Valley during the waxing and waning of the Kashmiri struggle, and its shifts of tactics, since 1989.

Kashmir's struggle for freedom continues, but with little support or awareness abroad, especially in the USA. In part, that's because there are so few Kashmiri-Americans. which is why I think it's so important for concerned on-Kashmiris like myself to speak up.

In 2008, while Mirwaiz Umar Farooq renewed his call for setting aside armed struggle to give nonviolent political tactics another chance, Kashmiris came out on the streets en masse for the first time since the early 1990's, with repeated marches of hundreds of thousands despite (again as in the early 1990's) repeated arrests and detention of political leaders and police and army firing on peaceful protesters.

The policy of the USA on Kashmir, as on other regions, is shaped more by the economic and "strategic" interests of the USA than by concern for democracy or human rights. Since 11 September 2001, India has been increasingly successful in portaraying its military occupation of Kashmir as part of its alliance with the USA in a "war on terror" (even as others see this as an ideological alliance, or at least a commonality of interest, between Hindu fundamentalists in India, Christian fundamentalists in the USA, and Jewish fundamentalists in Israel, united in a new Crusade against Islam that manifests itself in Israel, Palestine, Iraq, Afghanistan. and Kashmir).

India's government continues to betray its long-standing promises of self-determination, promises made not only to the Kashmiri people but also to the United Nations. The region called "Jammu and Kashmir" is neither homogenous or unified, and it remains unclear what choices Kashmiris in different parts of the region would make. But as a friend of Kashmir, India, and Pakistan, I try to do what I can to call attention to the moral and political entitlement of the Kashmiri people to determine their own destiny, not to have it decided for them by India, Pakistan, or any other foreign power.

Some Indian nationalists will probably think me anti-Indian for my views on Kashmir. But while I deplore the Indian occupation of Kashmir, I actually think that India and modern Indian political thought deserve more, not less, attention and respect in the USA and the rest of the North. It's sad that India's Kashmir policy sullies India's record and is one more obstacle to foreigners realizing how much they could learn from India and Indians. I'm pretty cynical, but I was appalled when I found that a friend's doctoral degree program in political science at a well-reputed research university in the USA did not require any familiarity with Gandhi, Nehru, or any other Southern political thinker or statesperson.

Some will also think me a Muslim dupe for supporting Kashmiri self-determination. I don't think I'm biased toward Islam. I think it's just that, as an atheist, I'm less biased against Islam than is mainstream Christian opinion in the USA. Not all that's bad, or good, about countries where most people are Muslim is attributable to Islam, any more than all that's bad or good about the USA is attributable to Christianity. Religion is only one of many influences. I'm not a fan of religions in general, but I'm fairly neutral among different religions. In any case, I try to base my judgements on what people do, regardless of their beliefs -- or lack thereof. Interestingly, the Kashmiri nationalist organization which had the most widespread support was the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF), which was secular, socialist, and as opposed to Pakistani occupation as to Indian. The same is true of what has been the principal voice of Kashmiri opinion in the USA, the Kashmiri American Council .

2. Links to my writings and other resources on Kashmir Articles on Kashmir and related issues by Edward Hasbrouck: Organizations and actions: Film, video, and audio:

Source:

hasbrouck.org

ERIC - Women and Violence: A Study of Women s Empowerment and Its Challenges in Jammu and Kashmir, Online Submission, 2015-Feb

Gul, Showkeen Bilal Ahmad

Online Submission. Reviews of Literature v2 n7 p1-9 Feb 2015

The focus of this paper is to highlight the violence against women's in Jammu and Kashmir. In Jammu and Kashmir Woman are the most vulnerable and worst hit section of the society especially under situations of violence caused by militancy and armed conflict. They don't only suffer from intense humiliation and harassment but also undergo traumatic experiences with prolonged depression making them mentally sick. However the disturbing situation prevalent in Jammu and Kashmir has hit the Kashmiri women hardest. Thousands of women who have become widows have to bear the entire responsibility of bringing up their children and running the household expenditure. The results drawn were; women in Jammu and Kashmir are still left with lot of issues and challenges related to health, economy, education, politics, domestic violence, declining sex ratio, female feticide and infanticide, state violence, dowry harassment, eve teasing, unequal wages and child labour. The central government, state government, NGO's and local bodies should work jointly for the empowerment of women in Jammu and Kashmir.

Source:

eric.ed.gov

India-Pakistan Conflict Update: Kashmir Death Toll Climbs As Soldiers, Children Killed In Border Clash

India-Pakistan Conflict Update: Kashmir Death Toll Climbs As Soldiers, Children Killed In Border Clash

Continued shelling across the border between India and Pakistan in Kashmir killed four and injured several others, officials from both sides said Monday. In the latest episode in the ongoing violence between the nuclear-armed neighbors, a one-year-old baby, an Indian soldier and a six-year-old boy were reported to have been killed.

Pakistan’s military claimed an 18-month-old girl and another civilian were killed on its side after “unprovoked Indian firing” at the “working boundary” that divides Kashmir between Pakistan’s Punjab province and the Indian-administered state of Jammu and Kashmir. India said a Border Security Force head constable and a six-year-old boy were killed after Pakistani soldiers engaged in heavy mortar shelling along the international border in the early hours of Monday morning.

Both India and Pakistan have pressed their claims for the region since becoming independent states in 1947, fighting two wars over it. The Indian-administered region has a majority Muslim population and has been the scene for growing protests against Indian rule in recent months. The killing of a young Kashmiri fighter by Indian forces in July sparked a fresh wave of mass protests and a firm crackdown by India.

Tensions then rose to their highest level in several years after militants, which India claimed came from Pakistan, attacked an Indian military base, killing 19 on Sept. 18. India later said that it carried out “surgical strikes” on a terrorist stronghold on the Pakistan side of the Line of Control. Pakistan continues to deny that version of events.

The war of words, along with the violence, has continued since. On Friday, India’s Border Security Forceclaimed that it killed seven Pakistani soldiers as retaliation for sniper fire that resulted in the loss of life of one of its own fighters. Again Pakistan denied the claim, alleging that the firing was unprovoked and had not struck any of its soldiers.

India has long accused Pakistan of sponsoring terrorists. Pakistan, meanwhile, has said that India’s claims about terrorism are part of a campaign to distract attention from its “atrocities” in Kashmir.

There is also significant dispute over the border conflict within Pakistan. On Monday, chairman of the opposition party Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, Imran Kahn, accused Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif of using the dispute for his own political means and of being “the biggest security threat” in the country.

"Whenever there is pressure on Nawaz Sharif, the Line of Control becomes heated,” Kahn, a former Pakistan cricket hero said Sunday .

Source:

www.ibtimes.com

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