Ebooks for you

The Poetical Works Of Sir David Lyndsay Of The Mount: Lion King At Arms, Under James V.

Category: Other

  • Book Title: The poetical works of Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount: Lion king at arms, under James V.
  • ISBN 13:
  • ISBN 10:
  • Author: Sir David Lindsay
  • Category:
  • Category (general): Other
  • Publisher:
  • Format & Number of pages: book
  • Synopsis: Noy, Noye, to trouble, to vex, to annoy: pret. noyit : So noye, in O. Eng. R. of Brunne ; noie, Chaucer ; noy, Spenser : pret. ... Nook, Johnson. Netck, in Mod. Scotish. So newk, in the Yorksh. dialect. Shakspeare has ni-oi-shotten, for shooting out ...

Another description

Map of David Lyndsay - The Full Wiki

David Lyndsay: Map

Sir David Lyndsay

Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount. (also spelled: Lindsay ) (c. 1490 – c. 1555) was a Scottish officer of arms and poet of the 16th century, whose works reflect the spirit of the Renaissance .

Biography

He was the son of David Lyndsay, second of the Mount (Fife ), and of Garmylton. (Haddingtonshire ) (d.circa. 1503). His place of birth and education are unknown, but it is thought that he attended the University of St Andrews . on the books of which appears an entry "Da Lindesay" for the session 1508-1509. He was engaged at court, first as an equerry, then as an "usher" to the future King James V of Scotland. In 1522 he married Janet Douglas, a court seamstress. His first heraldic appointment was as Snowdon Herald and in 1529 he was appointed Lord Lyon King of Arms. and knighted. He was engaged in diplomatic business (twice on embassies abroad--to the Netherlands and France), and was, in virtue of his heraldic office, a general master of ceremonies. After the death of James V, in 1542, Lyndsay continued to sit in Parliament of Scotland as commissioner for Cupar, Fife; and in 1548 he was member of a mission to Denmark which obtained certain privileges for Scottish merchants. There is reason to believe that he died in or about 1555.

Literary works

Most of Lyndsay's literary work, by which he secured great reputation in his own day and by which he still lives, was written during the period of prosperity at court. In this respect he is different from Gavin Douglas. who abandoned literature to become a politician. The difference is due partly to the fact that Lyndsay's muse was more occasional and satirical, and that the time was suitable to the exercise of his special gifts. It is more difficult to explain how he enjoyed such unparalleled freedom of speech. He chastised all classes, from his royal master to the most simple. There is no evidence that he abjured Catholicism; yet his leading purpose was the exposure of its errors and abuses. His aid was readily accepted by the reforming party, and by their use of his work he shared with their leaders throughout many generations a reputation which is almost exclusively political and ecclesiastical.

Lyndsay's longer poems represent, with reasonable completeness, the range of Lyndsay's literary talent. No single poem can give him a chief place, though here and there, especially in the last, he gives hints of the highest competence. Yet the corporate effect of these pieces is to secure for him the allowance of more than mere intellectual vigour and common sense. There is in his craftsmanship, in his readiness to apply the traditional methods to contemporary requirements, something of that accomplishment which makes even the second-rate man of letters interesting.

Lyndsay, the Makar. is not behind his fellow-poets in acknowledgment to Geoffrey Chaucer. As piously as they, he reproduces the master's forms; but in him the sentiment and outlook have suffered change. His nearest approach to Chaucer is in The Historie and Testament of Squyer Meldrum . which recalls the sketch of the "young squire" ; but the reminiscence is verbal rather than spiritual. Elsewhere his memory serves him less happily, as when he describes the array of the lamented Queen Magdalene in the words which Chaucer had applied to the eyes of his wanton Friar. So too, in the Dreme . the allegorical tradition survives only in the form. "Remembrance" conducts the poet over the old-world itinerary, but only to lead him to speculation on Scotland's woes and to an "Exhortatioun to the Kingis Grace" to bring relief. The tenor is well expressed in the motto from the Vulgate --"Prophetias nolite spernere.Omnia autem probate: quod bonum est tenete ."

This didactic habit is freely exercised in the long poem Ane Dialog betwixt Experience and ane Courteor (sometimes called the Monarchie ), a universal history of the medieval type, in which the falls of princes by corruption supply an object lesson to the unreformed church of his day. Ane Pleasant Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis is more direct in its attack on ecclesiastical abuse; and its dramatic form permits more lively treatment. This piece is of great historical interest, being the only extant example of a complete Scottish morality. It is in respect of literary quality Lyndsay's best work, and in dramatic construction and delineation of character it holds a high place in this genre. The farcical interludes (in places too coarse for modern taste) supply many touches of genuine comedy; and throughout the play there are passages, as in the speeches of Veritie in the First Part and of Dame Chastitie in the "Interlude of the Sowtar and the Taylor," in which word and line are happily conceived.

The Testament of the Papyngo (parrot ), drawn in the familiar medieval manner, is another tract for the time, full of admonition to court and clergy. Of his shorter pieces, The Complaynt and Publict Confessions of the Kingis Auld Hound, callit Bagsche, directit to Bawtie, the Kingis best belovit Dog, and his companyconis. and the Answer to the Kingis Flyting have a like pulpit resonance. The former is interesting as a forerunnel of Burns 's device in the "Twa Dogs." The Deploratioun of the Death of Queen Magdalene is in the extravagant style of commemoration illustrated in Dunbar 's Elegy on the Lord Aubigny. The Justing betwix James Watsoun and Jhone Barbour is a contribution to the popular taste for boisterous fun, in spirit, if not in form, akin to the Christis Kirk on the Grene series; and indirectly, with Dunbar's Turnarnent and Of ane Blak-Moir. a burlesque of the courtly tourney. Lyndsay approaches Dunbar in his satire The Supplicatioun in contemptioun of syde taillis ("wide" trains of the ladies), which recalls the older poet's realistic lines on the filthy condition of the city streets. In Lyndsay's Descriptioun of Pedder Coffeis (pedlars) we have an early example of the studies in vulgar life which are so plentiful in later Scottish literature. In Kitteis Confessioun he returns, but in more sprightly mood, to his attack on the church.

In Lyndsay we have the first literary expression in Scotland of the Renaissance. His interest lies on the theological side of the revival; he is in no sense a humanist, and he is indifferent to the artistic claims of the movement. Still he appeals to the principle which is fundamental to all. He demands first-hand impression. He feels that men must get their lesson direct, not from intermediaries who understand the originals no more "than they do the ravyng of the rukis." Hence his persistent plea for the vernacular. nowhere more directly put than in the Dialog. in the "Exclamatioun to the Redar, toucheyng the wrytting of the vulgare and maternall language." Though he is concerned only in the theological and ecclesiastical application of this, he undoubtedly stimulated the use of the vernacular in a Scotland which in all literary matters beyond the concern of the irresponsible poet still used the lingua franca of Europe.

Critical literature

The arms of office for the Lord Lyon King of Arms, as painted by Alexander Liptak.

A complete edition of Lyndsay's poetical works was published by David Laing in 3 vols. in 1879. The E.E.T.S. issued the first part of a complete edition in 1865 (ed. F. Hall). Five parts have appeared, four edited by F. Hall. the fifth by J.A.H. Murray. For the bibliography see Laing's 3 vol. edition, u.s. iii. pp. 222 et seq. and the E.E.T.S. edition passim. See also the editions by Pinkerton (1792), Sibbald (1803), and George Chalmers (1806); and the critical accounts in Henderson 's Scottish Vernacular Literature (1898), Gregory Smith's Transition Period (1900), and J.H. Millar's Literary History of Scotland (1903). A professional work prepared by Lyndsay in the Lyon Office. entitled the Register of Scottish Arms (now preserved in manuscript in the Advocates' Library ), was printed in 1821 and reprinted in 1878. It remains the most authoritative document on Scottish heraldry .

Longer poems Other literature

David Lindsay of the Mount appears as the sympathetic major character in Nigel Tranter 's well-researched James V trilogy. The Riven Realm (1984), James V, By the Grace of God (1985), and Rough Wooing (1987).

Lindsay's description of the Tower of Babel in his Dialog ("The shadow of that hyddeous strength [the Tower of Babel] sax myle and more it is of length") is used as the motto of the novel "That Hideous Strength " by C. S. Lewis. and the book's name is also derived from it.

See also

Source:

maps.thefullwiki.org

Articles

Sir David Lyndsay Facts

Sir David Lyndsay Facts

The Scottish poet and courtier Sir David Lyndsay (ca. 1485-1555) was probably the best-known Scottish poet from his death until the mid-18th century. He was widely credited with effecting the reformation of the Scottish Church.

David Lyndsay was the eldest son of Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount, a Scottish nobleman. Nothing is known of his youth, although his poetry suggests that he had a sound formal education. He first appears in court records as a participant in a play performed in 1511. In 1512 he was appointed "usher," or personal attendant, to the infant prince, who would become King James V. He later reminded the King in one of his poems of how he cared for him, played the lute for him, told him stories, and entertained him. In 1522 Lyndsay married Janet Douglas, a royal seamstress.

In 1524 young James fell under the control of the Queen Mother and the Douglases, and Lyndsay lost his position at court. But in 1528 the Douglases fell from power, and Lyndsay was restored. He acted as chief herald to the King from 1529 until 1542, when he was knighted and made Lyon king, or chief herald, officially. His earliest attack on the evils of the times appears in "The Testament and Compleynt of Our Soverane Lordis Papyngo" (1530). The clergy here suffers heavily, for the dying parrot (papyngo) is ill-treated by a magpie (regular canon), a raven (Benedictine), and a kite (friar). After abusing the poor parrot, these "birds" devour him.

His official position at court took Lyndsay overseas at various times in the capacity of an ambassador. Thus he accompanied the envoys sent to arrange a marriage between King James V and Marie de Bourbon. But James, who followed his ambassadors, preferred Magdalen, eldest daughter of the King of France. She was of frail constitution, however, and died before her coronation. Lyndsay wrote an elegy for her in which he describes in detail the pageantry that was to have accompanied the ceremony. James married Mary of Lorraine in 1538. She was welcomed at St. Andrews with an elaborate and instructive pageant designed by Sir David.

Shortly after the marriage of the King, Lyndsay composed his most famous work, A Pleasant Satyre of the Thrie Estaits, an interlude or play faintly reminiscent in substance and technique of the "Vision" of Piers Plowman attributed to William Langland. But the reforming doctrines are now more extreme, and there are direct attacks on the Pope. The clergy is revealed to be sensual, ignorant, grasping, and generally corrupt, and there are unmistakable traces of the traditional attacks on the friars that also appear in Geoffrey Chaucer and William Dunbar. The play is vigorous and effective. It was performed again in 1552 and in an expanded version in 1554.

The English invaded Scotland in 1542, and King James died late in the year. As Lyon king, Sir David visited the courts of Charles V, Francis I, and Henry VIII to return the Order of the Golden Fleece, the Order of St. Michael, and the Order of the Garter held by his late master. Lyndsay's interest in chivalry is evident in his biography in the form of a romance, Squyer Meldrum, written about 1550. The young hero, who was an actual person, distinguishes himself in both war and love. The same interest appears in different form in the satirical poem "The Justing betwix James Watsoun and Jhone Barbour."

It is difficult to estimate Lyndsay's exact position with reference to the Church. He is said to have encouraged John Knox, but he can hardly be called a follower of Knox. His last work, The Monarchie, completed about 1553, is a poem of religious instruction. In it he recommends that the Bible be read in the language of the people and that ordinary prayers also be conducted in that language.

Further Reading on Sir David Lyndsay

A good account of Lyndsay's life and work is by William Murison, Sir David Lyndsay: Poet and Satirist of the Old Church in Scotland (1938). A biography of Lyndsay appears in Henry Morley, English Writers (11 vols. 1887-1895), and a brief scholarly study of his work in James Kinsley, ed. Scottish Poetry: A Critical Survey (1955), Kurt Wittig, The Scottish Tradition in Literature (1958), contains a chapter on Lyndsay.

Source:

biography.yourdictionary.com

Lyndsay, Sir David

Lyndsay, Sir David

died. before April 18, 1555

Scottish poet of the pre-Reformation period who satirized the corruption of the Roman Catholic church and contemporary government. He was one of the company of gifted courtly poets (makaris ) who flourished in the golden age of Scottish literature. His didactic writings in colloquial Scots were characterized by a ribald buffoonery and a combination of moralizing and humour.

Born into an aristocratic family, Lyndsay was appointed attendant and companion to the infant prince (born 1512), the son of King James IV. Dismissed from court 12 years later, when his charge, then James V, fell under the control of the Douglas faction, he returned to the king's service in 1528. An influential diplomat, Lyndsay represented the king on important missions to the courts of Henry VIII, Charles V, Francis I (after James's death in 1542), and other European monarchs. Most of his verse, with a work on heraldry, was written during his prosperous years at court.

Lyndsay's Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaits is the only surviving complete Scottish morality play. Originally entitled “the mysdemeanours of Busshops Religious persones and preists within the Realme” (1540), it was enlarged with coarse comedy and performed in 1552 at Cupar, Fife. and again on the slopes of the Calton Hill, Edinburgh. It is a dramatic representation of the crucial issues of the midcentury in religion, government, and social life, with all classes of society mirrored, admonished, and entertained.

The Dreme (completed 1528), Lyndsay's earliest surviving work in verse, is an allegory of the contemporary condition of Scotland, with a delightfully personal epistle to the king. The Testament and Complaynt of Our Soverane Lordis Papyngo (completed 1530), written to celebrate the king's escape from the Douglases, is a mixture of satire, comedy. and moral instruction in which the king's dying parrot gives advice to the king and court; and his An Answer quhilk Schir David Lyndsay maid to the Kingis Flyting (1536) is a ribald example of the game of poetic abuse (“flyting”) practiced by Celtic poets. The Complaynt and Publict Confessioun of the Kingis Auld Hound callit Bagsche (c. 1536) is a short didactic piece, satirizing court life through the mouth of a dog, a device later revived by Robert Burns.

Look at other dictionaries:

Lindsay (Lyndsay), Sir David — (?1486 1555) A Scottish poet of the pre Reformation period who satirized the corruption of the Roman Catholic Church and contemporary government. He was one of the company of gifted courtly poets (makaris) who flourished in the golden age of… … British and Irish poets

Lindsay, or Lyndsay, Sir David — (1490 1555) Scottish poet and satirist, s. of David L. of Garmylton, near Haddington, was b. either there or at The Mount in Fife, and ed. at St. Andrews. Early in life he was at the Court of James IV. and on the King s death was appointed to … Short biographical dictionary of English literature

LINDSAY or LYNDSAY, SIR DAVID, OF THE MOUNT — Scottish poet, born at the Mount, near Cupar, Fife, at the grammar school of which he was educated, as afterwards at St. Andrews University; was usher to James V. from his childhood, and knighted by him after he came of age; did diplomatic… … The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

Lindsay, Sir David — (David Lyndsay of the Mount) (ca. 1486–ca. 1555) Sometimes called “the last Scottish Chaucerian,” Sir David Lindsay had a career that straddled the late medieval and early modern periods. Like CHAUCER’s, his verse is often satiric, and his… … Encyclopedia of medieval literature

Lyndsay — David Lyndsay David Lyndsay (Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount, alternative Schreibweise David Lindsay; * um 1490; † 18. April 1554) war ein schottischer Dichter. Lyndsay war adeliger Abstammung und diente lange Zeit am Hof der schottischen Könige… … Deutsch Wikipedia

David Lindsay — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Sir David Lyndsay Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount, (también escrito: Lindsay) (n. cerca de 1490 f. cerca de 1555) fue un oficial de armas y poeta escocés, del siglo XVI, cuyas obras reflejan el espí … Wikipedia Español

David Lyndsay — (Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount, alternative Schreibweise David Lindsay; * um 1490; † 18. April 1554) war ein schottischer Dichter. Lyndsay war adeliger Abstammung und diente lange Zeit am Hof der schottischen Könige Jakob IV. und Jakob V.; 1531… … Deutsch Wikipedia

Lyndsay — [ lɪndzɪ], Lindsay, Sir David, schottischer Dichter, * bei Haddington (Lothian Region) um 1490, ✝ Edinburgh um 1555; diente am Königshof, war als Diplomat in England und Dänemark. Er schrieb humoristisch satirische Gedichte, in denen er die… … Universal-Lexikon

David Laing (antiquary) — David Laing (20 April 1793 – 18 October 1878) was a Scottish antiquary. Portrait by Sir William Fettes Douglas The son of William Laing, a bookseller in Edinburgh, where he was born, he was educated at the Canongate Grammar School. At fourteen he … Wikipedia

David Laing (Scottish antiquary) — David Laing (April 20, 1793 ndash; October 18, 1878) was a Scottish antiquary.The son of William Laing, a bookseller in Edinburgh, where he was born, he was educated at the Canongate Grammar School. At fourteen he was apprenticed to his father.… … Wikipedia

Source:

universalium.academic.ru

David_Lyndsay: definition of David_Lyndsay and synonyms of David_Lyndsay (English)

Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese

Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese

definition - David_Lyndsay David Lyndsay

Sir David Lyndsay

The heraldic achievement of the Office of the Lord Lyon King of Arms.

Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount. (also spelled Lindsay ) (c. 1490 – c. 1555) was a Scottish Lord Lyon and poet of the 16th century, whose works reflect the spirit of the Renaissance .

Contents Biography

He was the son of David Lyndsay, second of the Mount (Fife ), and of Garmylton. (Haddingtonshire ) (d.circa. 1503). His place of birth and education are unknown, but it is thought that he attended the University of St Andrews. on the books of which appears an entry "Da Lindesay" for the session 1508-1509. He was engaged at court, first as an equerry, then as an "usher" to the future King James V of Scotland. In 1522 he married Janet Douglas, a court seamstress. His first heraldic appointment was as Snowdon Herald and in 1529 he was appointed Lord Lyon King of Arms. and knighted. He was engaged in diplomatic business (twice on embassies abroad—to the Netherlands and France), and was, in virtue of his heraldic office, a general master of ceremonies. After the death of James V, in 1542, Lyndsay continued to sit in Parliament of Scotland as commissioner for Cupar, Fife; and in 1548 he was member of a mission to Denmark which obtained certain privileges for Scottish merchants. There is reason to believe that he died in or about 1555.

Literary works

Most of Lyndsay's literary work, by which he secured great reputation in his own day and by which he still lives, was written during the period of prosperity at court. In this respect he is different from Gavin Douglas. who abandoned literature to become a politician. The difference is due partly to the fact that Lyndsay's muse was more occasional and satirical, and that the time was suitable to the exercise of his special gifts. It is more difficult to explain how he enjoyed such unparalleled freedom of speech. He chastised all classes, from his royal master to the most simple. There is no evidence that he abjured Catholicism; yet his leading purpose was the exposure of its errors and abuses. His aid was readily accepted by the reforming party, and by their use of his work he shared with their leaders throughout many generations a reputation which is almost exclusively political and ecclesiastical.

Lyndsay's longer poems represent, with reasonable completeness, the range of Lyndsay's literary talent. No single poem can give him a chief place, though here and there, especially in the last, he gives hints of the highest competence. Yet the corporate effect of these pieces is to secure for him the allowance of more than mere intellectual vigour and common sense. There is in his craftsmanship, in his readiness to apply the traditional methods to contemporary requirements, something of that accomplishment which makes even the second-rate man of letters interesting.

Lyndsay, the Makar. is not behind his fellow-poets in acknowledgment to Geoffrey Chaucer. As piously as they, he reproduces the master's forms; but in him the sentiment and outlook have suffered change. His nearest approach to Chaucer is in The Historie and Testament of Squyer Meldrum . which recalls the sketch of the "young squire" ; but the reminiscence is verbal rather than spiritual. Elsewhere his memory serves him less happily, as when he describes the array of the lamented Queen Magdalene in the words which Chaucer had applied to the eyes of his wanton Friar. So too, in the Dreme . the allegorical tradition survives only in the form. "Remembrance" conducts the poet over the old-world itinerary, but only to lead him to speculation on Scotland's woes and to an "Exhortatioun to the Kingis Grace" to bring relief. The tenor is well expressed in the motto from the Vulgate --"Prophetias nolite spernere. Omnia autem probate: quod bonum est tenete ."

This didactic habit is freely exercised in the long poem Ane Dialog betwixt Experience and ane Courteor (sometimes called the Monarchie ), a universal history of the medieval type, in which the falls of princes by corruption supply an object lesson to the unreformed church of his day. Ane Pleasant Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis is more direct in its attack on ecclesiastical abuse; and its dramatic form permits more lively treatment. This piece is of great historical interest, being the only extant example of a complete Scottish morality. It is in respect of literary quality Lyndsay's best work, and in dramatic construction and delineation of character it holds a high place in this genre. The farcical interludes (in places too coarse for modern taste) supply many touches of genuine comedy; and throughout the play there are passages, as in the speeches of Veritie in the First Part and of Dame Chastitie in the "Interlude of the Sowtar and the Taylor," in which word and line are happily conceived.

The Testament of the Papyngo (parrot ), drawn in the familiar medieval manner, is another tract for the time, full of admonition to court and clergy. Of his shorter pieces, The Complaynt and Publict Confessions of the Kingis Auld Hound, callit Bagsche, directit to Bawtie, the Kingis best belovit Dog, and his companyconis. and the Answer to the Kingis Flyting have a like pulpit resonance. The former is interesting as a forerunnel of Burns 's device in the "Twa Dogs." The Deploratioun of the Death of Queen Magdalene is in the extravagant style of commemoration illustrated in Dunbar 's Elegy on the Lord Aubigny. The Justing betwix James Watsoun and Jhone Barbour is a contribution to the popular taste for boisterous fun, in spirit, if not in form, akin to the Christis Kirk on the Grene series; and indirectly, with Dunbar's Turnarnent and Of ane Blak-Moir. a burlesque of the courtly tourney. Lyndsay approaches Dunbar in his satire The Supplicatioun in contemptioun of syde taillis ("wide" trains of the ladies), which recalls the older poet's realistic lines on the filthy condition of the city streets. In Lyndsay's Descriptioun of Pedder Coffeis (pedlars) we have an early example of the studies in vulgar life which are so plentiful in later Scottish literature. In Kitteis Confessioun he returns, but in more sprightly mood, to his attack on the church.

In Lyndsay we have the first literary expression in Scotland of the Renaissance. His interest lies on the theological side of the revival; he is in no sense a humanist, and he is indifferent to the artistic claims of the movement. Still he appeals to the principle which is fundamental to all. He demands first-hand impression. He feels that men must get their lesson direct, not from intermediaries who understand the originals no more "than they do the ravyng of the rukis." Hence his persistent plea for the vernacular. nowhere more directly put than in the Dialog. in the "Exclamatioun to the Redar, toucheyng the wrytting of the vulgare and maternall language." Though he is concerned only in the theological and ecclesiastical application of this, he undoubtedly stimulated the use of the vernacular in a Scotland which in all literary matters beyond the concern of the irresponsible poet still used the lingua franca of Europe.

Critical literature

A complete edition of Lyndsay's poetical works was published by David Laing in 3 vols. in 1879. The E.E.T.S. issued the first part of a complete edition in 1865 (ed. F. Hall). Five parts have appeared, four edited by F. Hall. the fifth by J.A.H. Murray. For the bibliography see Laing's 3 vol. edition, u.s. iii. pp. 222 et seq. and the E.E.T.S. edition passim. The Association for Scottish Literary Studies issued Janet Hadley Williams, David Lyndsay, Selected Poems. (2000) freshly establishing texts with detailed notes. See also the editions by Pinkerton (1792), Sibbald (1803), and George Chalmers (1806); and the critical accounts in Henderson 's Scottish Vernacular Literature (1898), Gregory Smith's Transition Period (1900), and J.H. Millar's Literary History of Scotland (1903). A professional work prepared by Lyndsay in the Lyon Office. entitled the Register of Scottish Arms (now preserved in manuscript in the Advocates' Library ), was printed in 1821 and reprinted in 1878. It remains the most authoritative document on Scottish heraldry .

Diplomatic duties Mission of June 1531

As Snowdon Herald, Lindsay was sent to the Emperor Charles V at the end of June 1531. He was to conclude their Treaty of Perpetual Peace for a duration of 100 years. This would succeed a treaty made 100 years previously. Other business included the long standing issue of Robert Barton of Over Barnton 's ship the Black Bark. seized by Spanish pirates off England in 1519. In his Latin letters to Charles V, James V refers to Lindsay as "chief herald" or "first of our order." [ 1 ] Lindsay stayed 7 weeks at court with the Emperor and Queen of Hungary at Brussels. [ 2 ]

Mission of March 1532

David Lindsay was set to go to France as a herald accompanying Thomas Erskine of Haltoun and the Bishop of Ross in January 1532. This Scottish embassy was delayed till March 1532. [ 3 ] The ambassadors were to contract with Francis I of France the marriage of James V to Madeleine of Valois. [ 4 ]

England 1535

Lindsay as Lion King of Arms accompanied Lord Erskine with Robert Hart, Rothesay Herald. to Windsor Castle. where they acted as proxy for the installation of James V as a Knight of the Order of the Garter. After travelling to meet Henry VIII at Thornbury Castle. they returned to London, where a servant of Thomas Cromwell gave Lindsay £20. [ 5 ]

Edinburgh 1540

David Lindsay conducted the visit of the English ambassador Ralph Sadler at Holyroodhouse in February 1540 with his assistant Rothesay Herald. They met Sadler, and brought him to James V at the Chapel Royal in the Palace then returned him to his lodgings and dined with him. Later, Lindsay arranged Sadler's meeting with Margaret Tudor. and brought him to meet her again in Chapel on the following Sunday. [ 6 ]

England 1543

After the death of James V, David Lindsay was sent by Regent Arran to England to return the late King's collar, garter, and statutes of the Order of the Garter to Stephen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester the prelate of the Order. Henry VIII wrote to Arran that Lindsay had fulfilled his office "right discreetly.". [ 7 ]

Longer poems Other literature

David Lindsay of the Mount appears as the sympathetic major character in Nigel Tranter 's well-researched James V trilogy. The Riven Realm (1984), James V, By the Grace of God (1985), and Rough Wooing (1987).

Lindsay's description of the Tower of Babel in his Dialog ("The shadow of that hyddeous strength [the Tower of Babel] sax myle and more it is of length") is used as the motto of the novel "That Hideous Strength " by C. S. Lewis. and the book's name is also derived from it.

Sir David appears as a character in Sir Walter Scott's epic poem Marmion .

Sir David Lindsay of the Mount is a major character in John Arden 's play Armstrong's Last Goodnight set in 16th Century Scotland.

See also References
  1. ^ Hay, Denys, ed. Letters of James V. HMSO (1954), 193-194.
  2. ^Letters & Papers Henry VIII. vol. 5 (1880), no. 324, 23 August 1531, Lindsay to the Secretary (Thomas Erskine of Haltoun ).
  3. ^Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. vol. 6, Edinburgh (1905), 44, 46-47, (the second set of payments for two months allowance was paid)
  4. ^ Hay, Denys, ed. The Letters of James V. HMSO (1954), 212.
  5. ^Letters & Papers Henry VIII. vol. 9, (1886), no. 165.
  6. ^Letters & Papers Henry VIII. vol. 15 (1896), no. 248, Sadler to Henry VIII: Sadler State Papers. vol. 1 (1809), no. 17.
  7. ^Letters & Papers of Henry VIII. vol. 18 part 1 (1901), no. 307, 21 March 1543, no.591, 24 May 1543: James V's copy of the Garter Statutes is now in the National Library of Scotland. MS 7143.
External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: David Lyndsay

Source:

dictionary.sensagent.com

Chalmers, George (1742-1825) (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library

Chalmers, George (1742-1825) (DNB00)

CHALMERS. GEORGE (1742–1825), Scottish antiquary and historian, was almost the last of the extinct race of authors who were antiquarians rather than historians, collectors and publishers rather than minute critics of historical antiquities. They existed in all countries, but Scotland produced several notable examples. The life of Chalmers is comprised in a record of the works which he compiled with indefatigable industry, and issued without a break during the last fifty years of his long life. His fame rests on one of them, the ‘Caledonia,’ which he called his standing work. The rest have been superseded by better editions, or become antiquated through his want of originality or mistaken views. Even the ‘Caledonia’ has not stood the test of time. It is below the standard of Camden's ‘Britannia’ or the works of Dugdale, the English antiquarian treatises which can most fairly be compared with it. Still, to have composed what is, though never completed, the fullest account of the antiquities of a nation which has specially cultivated that department of history is a merit not to be despised, and subsequent writers have borrowed from Chalmers without acknowledging their obligations. Born at Fochabers in Moray, a descendant of the family of Pittensear, Chalmers was educated at the parish school of Fochabers and King's College, Aberdeen. He afterwards studied law in Edinburgh. When twenty-one he accompanied his uncle to Maryland, and practised as a lawyer at Baltimore. Returning to Great Britain at the outbreak of the civil war, he settled in London in 1775, and devoted himself to literature. His first publications were political, and chiefly connected with the colonies. An answer from the electors of Bristol to Burke's letter on the affairs of America, published in 1777, appears to have been the latest, and it was soon followed by ‘Political Annals of the present United Colonies,’ 1780; an ‘Introduction to the History of the Revolt of the Colonies,’ vol. i. 1782; ‘Estimate of the comparative Strength of Great Britain during the present and four preceding Reigns,’ 1782; ‘Three Tracts on Ireland,’ 1785. In 1786 he was appointed chief clerk of the committee of privy council for trade and foreign plantations, and in 1790 he issued a ‘Collection of Treaties between Great Britain and other Powers.’ He next turned to biography, and published lives of De Foe, Thomas Paine (under the pseudonym of Oldys), and Thomas Ruddiman, the Scottish grammarian and printer, one of his best known works, containing much interesting matter conveyed in a style copied from Dr. Johnson. He was one of the literati deceived by Ireland's Shakespeare forgeries, and published several tracts on that controversy. In the beginning of this century he was attracted to the poetry and history of his native country, which had been too much neglected, and he printed editions of the poems of Allan Ramsay and Sir David Lyndsay, with lives of these poets. In 1807 he issued the first volume of his ‘Caledonia,’ designed to embrace the whole antiquities and history of Scotland in six volumes, but only three were published, the second in 1820, and the third in 1824. Scarcely a year passed without some new work, but none of them have now any but a bibliographical interest except his ‘Life of Mary Queen of Scots,’ with subsidiary memoirs, not of much value, but useful till better memoirs appear, of the lives of the regent Moray, Francis II, Darnley, Bothwell, and Maitland of Lethington. Besides his published works, Chalmers left large manuscript collections for the completion of the ‘Caledonia,’ a ‘History of Scottish Poetry,’ and a ‘History of Printing in Scotland,’ most of which are now in the Advocates' Library or the library of the university of Edinburgh ( Laing Bequest ). He died on 31 May 1825. A list of his works is appended; several of them were issued anonymously or pseudonymously.

  1. ‘Answer from the Electors of Bristol to the letters of Edmund Burke, Esq. on Affairs of America.’
  2. ‘Political Annals of the present United Colonies from the Settlement to the Peace of 1768. Compiled chiefly from Records. Ending at the Revolution, 1688,’ London, 1780, 4to.
  3. ‘The Propriety of allowing a qualified Export of Wool discussed historically,’ London, 1782, 8vo.
  4. ‘An Introduction to the History of the Revolt of the Colonies,’ vol. i. only printed, which was cancelled, London, 1782, 8vo, 500 pp. ending with the reign of George I.
  5. ‘An Estimate of the Comparative Strength of Great Britain during the present and four preceding Reigns,’ London, 1782, 4to.
  6. ‘Opinions on interesting subjects of Public Laws and Commercial Policy arising from American Independence,’ London, 1784, 8vo.
  7. ‘Three Tracts on the Irish Arrangements,’ London, 1785, 8vo.
  8. ‘Historical Tracts by Sir John Davies, with a Life of the Author,’ 1786, 8vo.
  9. ‘Life of Daniel De Foe,’ London, 1786, 1790, 8vo.
  10. ‘A Collection of Treaties between Great Britain and other Powers,’ London, 1790, 2 vols. 8vo.
  11. ‘Life of Thomas Paine. By Francis Oldys, A.M. of the University of Pennsylvania,’ London, 1793, 8vo.
  12. ‘Prefatory Introduction to Dr. Johnson's “Debates in Parliament,”’ London, 1794, 8vo.
  13. ‘Life of Thomas Ruddiman, M.A. To which are subjoined new Anecdotes of Buchanan,’ London, 1794, 8vo.
  14. ‘Vindication of the Privilege of the People in respect of the Constitutional Right of Free Discussion,’ London, 1796, 8vo. (anon.).
  15. ‘Apology for the Believers in the Shakespeare Papers which were exhibited in Norfolk Street, London,’ 1796, 8vo.
  16. ‘A Supplemental Apology,’ London, 1799, 8vo.
  17. ‘Appendix to the “Supplemental Apology,” being the Documents for the opinion that Hugh Boyd wrote Junius's Letters,’ 1800, 8vo.
  18. ‘The Poems of Allan Ramsay, with a Life of the Author,’ London, 1800, 2 vols. 8vo.
  19. ‘Observations on the State of England in 1696, by Gregory King, with a Life of the Author,’ 1804, 8vo.
  20. ‘Life of Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount, Lyon King-at-arms under James V,’ London, 1806, 3 vols. 8vo.
  21. ‘Caledonia; or an Account, Historical and Topographical, of North Britain … Chorographical and Philological,’ vol. i. London, 1807, vol. ii. 1810, vol. iii. 1824, all 4to.
  22. ‘A Chronological Account of Commerce and Coinage in Great Britain from the Restoration till 1810,’ 1810, 8vo.
  23. ‘Considerations on Commerce,’ 1811, 8vo.
  24. ‘An Historical View of the Domestic Economy of Great Britain and Ireland.’ New edition of ‘The Comparative Estimate’ corrected and enlarged, Edin. 1812, 8vo.
  25. ‘Opinions of Eminent Lawyers on various Points of English Jurisprudence,’ 1814, 2 vols. 8vo.
  26. A tract, privately printed, in answer to Malone's account of Shakespeare's ‘Tempest,’ London, 1815, 8vo.
  27. ‘Comparative Views of the State of Great Britain and Ireland before and since the War,’ London, 1817, 8vo.
  28. ‘The Author of “Junius” ascertained,’ 1817.
  29. Churchyard's ‘Chips concerning Scotland,’ with a life of the author, London, 1817, 8vo.
  30. ‘Life of Mary Queen of Scots, drawn from the State Papers, with six subsidiary Memoirs,’ London, 1818, 2 vols. 4to; reprinted in 3 vols. 8vo.
  31. ‘The Poetical Remains of some of the Scottish Kings now first collected,’ London, 1824, 8vo.
  32. ‘Robene and Makyne and the Testament of Cresseid,’ by Robert Henryson, edited and presented by Mr. Chalmers as his contribution to the Bannatyne Club, Edin. 1824, 4to.
  33. ‘A Detection of the Love Letters lately attributed in Hugh Campbell's work to Mary Queen of Scots,’ London, 1825, 8vo.

[Chalmers's own works; Anderson's Scottish Nation; David Laing's bibliography in Lowndes's Manual.]

Wikisource ®

Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.

Source:

en.wikisource.org

Tags: ebook reader nook preturi pentru